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Department of Classics

Cornell University Cornell University Cornell Univeristy Department of Classics

Graduate Students


Red-Figure Bell Krater

Red-Figure Bell Krater

Green Glass Bottle

Roman Glass Bottle

Vessel Lid

Lid of an Etruscan cinerary urn

Tablet

Portrait on a Roman funerary stele

Eagle

Jupiter and eagle

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Dennis Alley

dennis100x100

dra67@cornell.edu

  • Ancient History

Dennis earned his B.A., summa cum laude, in Classical Languages and Classical Civilization from Syracuse University (2011), where he garnered the Outstanding Graduating Senior in Classics Award.  His senior paper, “Acme and Degeneracy: Herodotus’ Characterization of Spartan Conduct in Book Nine,” analyzed Herodotus’ use of intertextuality and characterization in the final book of the Histories.  Dennis is a second year student whose research interests include early Greek historiography, Roman Historiography, Herodotus, the Athenian Empire, and the influence of Homeric and Archaic Greek poetry on early Greek historiography.

Natasha Binek

Natasha Binek

nmb79@cornell.edu

  • Classical Literature and Philology

Natasha received her Hon. B.A. with a double major of Classical Civilization and Latin from the University of Toronto in 2004. Having taught high school Latin and history for 6 years, she returned to the University of Toronto and obtained her M.A. in Classics in 2011. That same year marks the beginning of her studies at Cornell, particularly in the area of Classical Literature and Philology. She is interested in the ambivalent figure of Aphrodite in Greek and Latin verse, particularly, in the goddess’ complex portrayal in the epic tradition.

Liana Brent

Liana Brent

ljb269@cornell.edu Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Liana graduated with an MA in Classics from McMaster University (2012), where she wrote a thesis, “Artifacts and Burial Practices in the Vagnari Cemetery,” that addresses funerary commemoration on an imperial estate in Roman Italy. She is in her second year of the PhD program in the Classical Archaeology track, and she has participated in archaeological excavations at Etruscan and Roman sites in Pompeii, Gravina in Puglia, and Castel Viscardo near Orvieto. Liana’s research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and her work on the Vagnari cemetery will appear in an edited volume following the Beyond Vagnari conference that took place at the University of Edinburgh in 2012.

Lindsey Brill

Lindsey Brill

lnb38@cornell.edu Website

  • Ancient History

Lindsey received a BSc in Biochemistry (2008) and BA in Classics (2009) from Queen’s University.  She graduated with her MA from the University of Victoria in 2012.  Her Master’s thesis explored the social, economic, and agronomic significance of the veterinarian to the Roman world.  She commenced her studies at Cornell in Ancient History in 2012.  Her major research interests include ancient veterinary medicine, animal husbandry, and Roman social, economic, and military history.

Micaela Carignano

Micaela Carignano

mc2287@cornell.edu Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Micaela received a B.A. summa cum laude from Washington University in St. Louis in 2011, with a double major in Archaeology and Classics. She is now in her second year of graduate studies at Cornell University, concentrating in classical archaeology. Her main research interests include archaeology of everyday life and the domestic sphere, particularly in the Bronze Age Aegean. She has participated in excavations in Cyprus, Greece, and Mississippi.

Jennifer Carrington

Jennifer Carrington

jcc399@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Jennifer Carrington graduated with a BA (Hons) in Classics from the University of Queensland, Australia in 2009 with an Honours thesis on the sanctuaries and Greek material engagement at Naukratis in Egypt. She is in her third year of the PhD program in Classical Archaeology at Cornell and interested in how people throughout the east Mediterranean negotiated different material and cultural practices in the Hellenistic period. Her research interests also encompass ancient trade, materiality, museology, and archaeological theory.

Michael Esposito

Mike Esposito

me274@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Literature and Philology

Michael Esposito received his BA from Fordham University in 2008. After a year teaching Latin in a New York City high school, he joined the Cornell Classics Department and is now in his fifth year as a PhD candidate. He is working on completing his dissertation on rhetoric and the uses of information in the Aeneid. Other interests include Greek and Roman epic, oratory, and Latin elegy.

Carrie Atkins Fulton

Carrie Atkins

cea66@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Carrie received her B.A. in Classical Archaeology and Biology from Bowdoin College in 2006 and wrote a thesis on the worship of maritime goddesses in the ancient Mediterranean.  She completed a M.A. in Anthropology with a specialization in Nautical Archaeology at Texas A&M University in 2009.  Her Master’s thesis contextualized ritual artifacts on board the ancient ship.  Carrie entered the PhD program at Cornell in Classical Archaeology also in 2009.  She is interested in trade, shipbuilding, ancient religion, 3D digital recording procedures, and landscape studies.  She has participated in terrestrial and underwater excavations in New York, Maine, Florida, Turkey, and Cyprus. She is currently working on her dissertation which uses shipwrecks to explore materiality, agency, and trade networks in the ancient Mediterranean.

Katie Jarriel

Katie Jarriel

kmj72@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Katie received her BA in Anthropology from the Honors College at the University of South Carolina in 2010, with minors in Studio Art and Classical Studies.  Currently, Katie is a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate.  Her research interests include Bronze Age Aegean studies, illustration and 3D digital visualization, landscape studies, art, and phenomenology.  She has worked in Spain, Italy, Israel, Cyprus, and Greece.  Katie recently co-wrote a grant for a project which brings together leading scholars in a lecture series on wax and materiality in the ancient world.  Her work-to-date for the wax project is on display in Goldwin Smith Hall. She is currently participating in the Cambridge Keros survey, where she is recording the island’s extensive terraces using GPS and GIS technology.

Katie Kearns

Katie Kearns

cmk244@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Katie earned a BA from The George Washington University (2006) and an MA from the University of Arizona (2008) and is now in her fifth year at Cornell in the archaeology track.  She just completed a Fulbright grant (2012-2013) on Cyprus, where she did dissertation fieldwork on environmental and social change in one region of the island (Vasilikos and Maroni Valleys) in the early first millennium BC. In addition to fieldwork and geophysical survey (KAMBE Project) in several areas on Cyprus, Katie has also worked in Italy, Jordan, and Armenia, and her interests mostly concern ancient landscapes and paleoenvironmental studies, spatiality and social theory, historiography, and GIS applications in archaeology.  She has recently published work on the built environment of Vouni, Cyprus (2011), ancient landscape art (2013), and a forthcoming survey of environmental research on Cyprus (2014). 

Jeffrey Leon

Jeff Leon

jfl64@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Jeff earned a B.A., summa cum laude, in Classics and Archaeology from the George Washington University in 2007 and came to Cornell in the fall of that year.  He is interested in the ancient economy, scientific applications to archaeological research, archaeological theory, and the role of Classics in the modern university.  A sixth-year in Classical Archaeology, his dissertation, entitled “More Than ‘Counting Sheep’: Isotopic Approaches to Minoan Wool Production”, attempts to better understand the Minoan political economy using isotopic analyses to track shepherding strategies in Late Bronze Age Crete.  He has been a member of archaeological projects in Honduras, Israel, Crete, Cyprus and Armenia.

Elizabeth Lyon

LizzieResize

ell67@cornell.edu
Website

  • Ancient Philosophy

A student in the Barnard-Columbia-Juilliard Joint degree program, Elizabeth graduated summa cum laude and as salutatorian of her Columbia College class in 2011, majoring in Classical Studies.  The next two years she spent at the Juilliard School, earning her Masters of Music in cello performance and honored at graduation with the William Schuman Prize for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music.  Elizabeth is now a first-year student in the Ancient Philosophy Track.  She hopes to combine her research interests of metaphysics and ethics in the Platonic line of philosophy with investigation into ancient music theory.

Andrew Meis

Meis 100x100

ajm484@cornell.edu

  • Ancient Philosophy

Andrew received his B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2013, with a double major in Classics and Spanish. After a year teaching Latin at a charter school in Colorado, he began his graduate studies at Cornell in Fall 2014 on the ancient philosophy track. His undergraduate thesis considered the interplay between genre and characterization in Plato’s Symposium, particularly with regards to Socrates. Due to this project Andrew maintains a particular interest in the literary elements of Plato’s dialogues and of ancient philosophical writings in general. His other academic interests include the development of the Platonic tradition, Neoplatonism, and ancient literary criticism.

Jacob Nabel

Jake Nabel

jtn35@cornell.edu
Website

  • Ancient History

Jake earned a BA in Classics and Philosophy from Bard College in 2007 and completed the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania in 2010. His research revolves around Greco-Roman interactions with the Iranian world, especially during the Hellenistic and late Republican periods. A fourth year student in Ancient History, Jake is beginning a dissertation on diplomacy between the Roman and Parthian empires, as well as preparing two articles on Greek mercenaries in the fourth century BCE. He has excavated at a number of sites in Greece, Armenia, and Germany.

Nils Niemeier

NilsResize

npn24@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Archaeology

Nils Niemeier received his BA from the University of Richmond in May 2013, graduating magna cum laude as an Oldham Scholar with majors in Latin, Greek, and Classical Civilizations.  In 2013, he began his Ph.D. studies at Cornell in the Classical Archaeology track. He is deeply interested in the ways in which Greeks and Romans interacted with their environment in the Roman imperial period as evidenced in both zooarchaeological and archaeobotanical remains and in ancient scientific, medical, and agricultural texts.  Among his other research interests are ancient history, landscape archaeology, ancient medicine, hunting practices, farming, historical ecology, digital humanities, and the use of geographic information systems in Classical archaeology.  Nils was part of the excavation team at Hacımusalar Höyük in southwest Turkey in 2011, and worked on an archaeobotanical specimen database with Dr. Alain Touwaide at the Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions in Washington, D.C., over the summers of 2012 and 2013.

Peter Osorio

osorio 1X1

pio3@cornell.edu

  • Ancient Philosophy

Peter received his BA in Classical Studies and Economics from Dartmouth College (2012). He graduated with high honors for his thesis on Justus Lipsius' reception of Stoic determinism. He is also a graduate of UPenn's post-baccalaureate program in Classics. Peter joined the ancient philosophy joint-program in 2014. Peter is broadly interested in metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, and philosophy of mind. He takes particular interest in Hellenistic philosophy and Roman philosophers such as Cicero and Seneca. His other research areas include natural science texts, didactic poetry in Greek and Latin, and reception studies.

Goran Vidović

Goran Vidovic

gv58@cornell.edu
Website

  • Classical Literature and Philology

Goran joined Cornell Classics in 2010, after a Classics B.A./M.A (University of Belgrade, Serbia) and a Medieval Studies M.A. (Central European University, Budapest, Hungary); an article based on his M.A.thesis is published in 2010 under the title "Dish to Cash, Cash to Ash: Mandrogerus the Applied Parasite and the Evolution of Comedy." The same year Goran also published a Serbian translation of the anonymous late antique comedy the Querolus with introduction and commentary. His other publications include Serbian translations of Menander's Epitrepontes (2006), and Cicero's Letters to Atticus, III (2013). Recently he finished an English translation of Elektra by Danilo Kiš (1969) and a conference paper on Sophocles and Aristophanes. His next projects are papers on Aeschylus' Oresteia and Plautus' Casina. Currently, he is working on completing his dissertation on metapoetry in Terence. His main research interests are ancient drama, metapoetry, allusion and intertextuality, Sallust and Tacitus.

Jonathan Warner

Warner 1x1

jhw259@cornell.edu

  • Ancient History

Jonathan Warner received a B.A. in Classics and History from the George Washington University in 2012 and an M.A. in Classical Languages from the University of Georgia in 2014.  His Masters thesis, entitled "Vegetius' Epitoma rei militaris: Institutions, Rules, and Reception," focused on Vegetius' regulae bellorum generales, their function within the text, and their reception in Maurice's Strategikon.  He is currently a first-year student in the Ancient History track.  Jonathan's research interests include ancient military history and literature, historiography, and late antiquity.