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GREEK 1101 : Elementary Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction to Attic Greek. Designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.
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GREEK 1102 : Elementary Ancient Greek II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Continuation of GREEK 1101, prepares students for GREEK 2101.
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LATIN 1201 : Elementary Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.
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LATIN 1202 : Elementary Latin II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Continuation of LATIN 1201, using readings from various authors; prepares students for LATIN 1205.
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LATIN 1204 : Latin in Review
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Provides a fast-paced, comprehensive review of all the grammar and syntax typically covered in LATIN 1201 and LATIN 1202 or comparable Latin curricula. It begins with review of some material covered in LATIN 1201 and then continues with second-term Latin material (LATIN 1202). The final part of the course culminates in the reading of unchanged selections from Classical Latin authors specifically designed to transition students to the reading of Latin literary texts. For students who receive an A- or higher, the sequence is continued by LATIN 2201; those who receive a B+ or lower should continue with LATIN 1205.
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LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Legends and Lore from Rome, the Eternal City; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
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LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Legends and Lore from Rome, the Eternal City; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
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CLASS 1331 : Elementary Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 1131, SANSK 1131 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
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CLASS 1332 : Elementary Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 1132, SANSK 1132 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
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CLASS 1522 : FWS: Subversive Myth and Politics in Imperial Rome
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course traces increasing restrictions on freedom of speech from the late Roman Republic to the imperial era. It thus offers a select survey of the most influential period of Latin literature with a specific political agenda. Also, since early first century statuary and architecture played a vital role in imperial propaganda, students look at how Octavian portrayed himself in the guise of specific gods, and observe the not always flattering depictions of these gods in Augustan poetry. In sum, students gain an intimate familiarity with the political climate of the late Roman republic and early imperial age in a synthesis of literature, history and iconography organized around the dueling themes of freedom of speech and censorship.
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CLASS 1531 : FWS: Greek Myth
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and six essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
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CLASS 1564 : FWS: Socrates v. STEM
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Plato's Protagoras presents a debate about the method/s by which one can become a successful person and a good citizen through an often funny duel between Socrates and Protagoras. Protagoras and his fellow intellectuals claim to have a set of technical skills (ranging from math to public speaking) that empower students. Socrates finds their claims underwhelming and inadequate as the basis of real happiness. To even the odds, we will also read a number of short contemporary works that support Protagoras' side. The course will follow Plato's intense focus on methods of debate and analysis. We will learn how to interpret informal arguments and how to reconstruct theories sketched in the text and to set them out with clarity and concision.
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CLASS 1576 : FWS: War, Politics and Human Nature: The History of Thucydides
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The war between Athens and Sparta (431-404 BC) as written by Thucydides is recognized as a paradigm for international relations, military strategy and the challenges of political leadership under a democracy. Its admirers range from Colin Powell to Bob Dylan. But Thucydides is also a compelling storyteller, portraying advocates of idealistic patriotism or aggressive brutality, relating episodes of tragic miscalculation or murderous political hysteria. We will study him as a model for observing and understanding the range of actions that humans can take against each other. We will also note what he edits out, but his contemporaries did not: women and the family (Lysistrata), religion (Antigone and Oedipus), and transcendent moral values (Plato's accounts of Socrates). Requirements include regular participation, presentations on assigned topics, and six essays.
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CLASS 1615 : Introduction to Ancient Rome
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ancient Rome was a village the size of Ithaca that grew into a world empire. In this course students will be introduced to some of its literature, art, and famous personalities in the classical period (2nd c. BCE – 2nd c. CE). In it we will read the masterpieces of Latin literature, from Virgil's Aeneid to Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Catullus' lyrics to Livy's moralizing History of Rome. Special attention will be given to the late republic and Augustan period. No prior knowledge of the ancient world is necessary. All readings are in English.
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CLASS 1699 : English Words: Histories and Mysteries
Crosslisted as: LING 1109 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Where do the words we use come from? This course examines the history and structure of the English vocabulary from its distant Indo-European roots to the latest in technical jargon and slang. Topics include formal and semantic change, taboo and euphemism, borrowing, new words from old, "learned" English loans from Greek and Latin, slang, and society.
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GREEK 2101 : Intermediate Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to Greek prose by reading Plato's Apology. Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in GREEK 1102.
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GREEK 2103 : Homer
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Selected readings from the Odyssey.
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GREEK 2144 : Intermediate Modern Greek II
Crosslisted as: NES 2343 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Develops the student's proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing modern Greek. Exposure to contemporary cultural material (newspapers, Greek websites, films, literary and musical material) will be complemented with grammar, vocabulary, and exercises in an effort to expand students' familiarization with modern Greek language and culture.
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LATIN 2201 : Latin Prose
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Readings from Cicero's Philippics - his fierce denunciations of Mark Antony, delivered after the assassination of Julius Caesar. We will read these speeches with close attention to their rhetorical style and historical context, discovering the reasons for their political potency, which led directly to Cicero's own politically-motivated murder.
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LATIN 2203 : Catullus
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The aim of the course is to present the poems of Catullus within their cultural and poetical context. The poems will be read and translated, and their significance both individually and in relation to the poetic context will be discussed in class. Some selections from the works of Catullus' contemporaries will be assigned in translation.
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LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
CLASS 2351 : Intermediate Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 2251, SANSK 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
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CLASS 2352 : Intermediate Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 2252, SANSK 2252 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
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CLASS 2601 : The Greek Experience
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to the literature and intellectual life of ancient Greece from Homer to the early centuries of Roman rule. We will read and discuss ancient writers as creative artists in their own right, to develop a clearer sense of what the Greeks themselves sought to express, rather than as sources for a synthetic modern overview of antiquity. Among our texts will be Homer's Odyssey, Greek lyric poetry, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and Lucian, set against a backdrop of Greek geography, history, and art. No knowledge of Ancient Greece (or Greek) is either assumed or required. Texts will be read in English translation. But students wishing to read parts of any assigned works in the original may apply do so independently with the instructor for additional credit.
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CLASS 2603 : Initiation to Greek Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Limited to 18 students. Intended especially for first-year students. Students must apply in writing to chair, Department of Classics, 120 Goldwin Smith Hall. No prior knowledge necessary (all texts are in translation). What is necessary is a willingness to participate actively in two seminar meetings each week and occasional supplementary workshops with specially invited guests. This course covers a wide range of Greek literary and philosophical works as well as modern critical and philosophical writings. The focus throughout is on the status of language, the many forms of discourse that appear in the literature, and the attempts the Greeks themselves made to grapple with the challenges inherent in language as the medium of poetry and philosophy. The course inquires into the intellectual development of a culture infused with traditional, mythological accounts of the cosmos. It asks how poetic forms such as tragedy engage with philosophical discourse while creating intense emotional effects on audiences both during antiquity and beyond.
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CLASS 2604 : Greek Mythology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Survey of the Greek myths, with emphasis on the content and significance of the myths in Mediterranean society, including the place of myth in Greek life and consciousness; the factors and influences involved in the creation of myths; and the use of myths for our understanding of Greek literature, religion, and moral and political concepts.
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CLASS 2605 : Theater, Sport, and Spectacle: Performance and Competition in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: PMA 2605 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A study of richly documented tradition of competitive artistic, athletic, and spectacular performances sponsored by cities, wealthy individuals, and kings/emperors in antiquity, with special attention to the ongoing connections and cross-influences between music/theater, athletics, and human/animal combats. We will take our comparative material from the fifth century bce to the late Roman empire. Topics include organizational frameworks, funding sources, associations of performers and their ideologies and rivalries, regulation and hierarchies of audiences, public claques, the adaptation of performance to political events, influence on art, and institutional and intellectual opposition. Evidence will include ancient treatises, inscriptions, mosaics, wall-paintings, and terracottas; all source readings available in English.
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CLASS 2612 : The Roman Experience
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Introduction to the civilization of the Romans as expressed in their literature, religion, and social and political institutions.
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CLASS 2630 : Drinking in the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2522, JWST 2522, NES 2522 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.
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CLASS 2635 : Ancient Iraq: Cities, Migrations, and Kings
Crosslisted as: JWST 2625, NES 2625 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course surveys the history and cultures of ancient Mesopotamia (e.g., Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria) from the beginnings of civilization to the death of Alexander the Great. It will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective and will rely on approaches and evidence drawn from branches of history, archaeology, world literature, and ethno-historical comparisons. Discussion centers on a number of recurrent themes: urban versus nonurban residence, population dynamics and cultural interaction, the birth of literature, and centralizing versus decentralizing political forces.
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CLASS 2636 : Introduction to Christian History
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2695, NES 2695, RELST 2695 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the history of Christianity from the first century through the seventeenth and perhaps a bit beyond. Our emphasis will be on the diversity of Christian traditions, beliefs, and practices throughout history. We will explore the origins of Christianity within the eastern Mediterranean world, the spread of Christianity, the development of ecclesiastical institutions, the rise and establishment of monasticism, and the various controversies that occupied the church throughout its history. Throughout the course, we will supplement our reading of primary texts with art, archaeology, music, and manuscripts.
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CLASS 2642 : The Art of Math: Mathematical Traditions of Symmetry and Harmony
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2642, MUSIC 2642 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Symmetry and harmony are central aesthetic concepts built on a long history of mathematical exploration, not just in the European mathematical tradition but also in mathematical texts from China, India, and the Islamic world. This course will cover theoretical proofs and practical applications from geometrical, harmonic, and astronomical traditions ranging from ancient Greek geometry to early modern science. Topics include geometrical proofs, calculating systems, astronomical models, ratios and proportions, and scales and temperaments.
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CLASS 2646 : Magic and Witchcraft in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2846, ARKEO 2846, NES 2546 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Modern perceptions of Classical civilizations often stress those aspects of their cultures that are compatible with contemporary concepts of "rational thought." Certainly, Greek and Roman scholars did make great achievements in science, medicine, and philosophy - but these multifaceted societies also had a place for magical amulets, love potions, and curse tablets. Drawing on both archaeological and textual evidence, we will (1) investigate a range of ancient and modern approaches to the concept of "magic," and (2) explore the role of magical practices in ancient Greek and Roman society.
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CLASS 2661 : Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introductory survey of ancient Greek philosophy from the so-called Presocratics (6th century BCE) through the Hellenistic period (1st century BCE) with special emphasis on the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
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CLASS 2675 : Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander
Crosslisted as: HIST 2650 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.
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CLASS 2685 : Egyptomania: Imagining Egypt in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2285, ARKEO 2285, NES 2985 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Throughout Greek and Roman history, the idea of Egypt inspired powerful imaginative responses ranging from fascination to fear. This course investigates Egyptian interactions with the Greco-Roman world and the changing Greek and Roman attitudes towards Egypt. Readings will cover subjects including the earliest Egyptian-Aegean trade, Herodotus' accounts of Egypt, Greco-Macedonian kings on the throne of the pharaohs, Roman perceptions of the notorious Cleopatra, the worship of Egyptian gods in the Greco-Roman world, and the incorporation of Egypt into the Roman empire (among other topics). Through an examination of Greek and Roman representations of Egypt, we will investigate how Greeks and Romans conceived of their own societies and cultural identities. Finally, we will also address images of Egypt in modern popular culture; how have Greco-Roman portrayals of Egypt helped shape today's view of the Pharaonic world?
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CLASS 2688 : Cleopatra's Egypt: Tradition and Transformation
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2688, NES 2688 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Under a Greco-Macedonian ruling dynasty, the Ptolemies, Egypt became a crossroads for the entire Mediterranean. Popular culture today remembers Ptolemaic Egypt best for the exploits of the famous queen Cleopatra, but a deeper study of this diverse society provides a unique window onto the ways that Greeks and Egyptians viewed the concepts of "Hellenicity" and "Egyptianness." In this course, we will examine a variety of social, political, economic, and cultural perspectives on Ptolemaic Egypt and its relationships with the rest of the Mediterranean world. Topics include (1) the political and economic history of Ptolemaic Egypt; (2) the multicultural character of Ptolemaic society; (3) the interaction of Greek and Egyptian religious systems, and the creation of "fusion" gods; (4) Ptolemaic relations with the rest of the Hellenistic world and beyond; and (5) the relevance of Ptolemaic Egypt to an understanding of modern phenomena such as globalism, tourism, and colonialism.
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CLASS 2700 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2700, ARTH 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York
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CLASS 2710 : Roman Wall Painting
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2710, ARTH 2710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Some of our very best evidence for Roman art survives in the form of frescoes in Rome, Ostia and (especially) the area surrounding Pompeii. This course will take you through imperial palaces, rural villas, town houses, shops, baths, tombs, taverns and gardens, examining the visual dynamics and socio-cultural significance of wall-paintings within their original archaeological contexts. The study of frescoes offers an exciting means of tackling important questions relating to Roman social history (issues of class, gender, familial and political structures), while inviting us to explore visual themes such as the relationship between art and nature, the use of myth, the spatial dynamics of domestic decorative schemes and concepts of ornament.
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CLASS 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2711, ARTH 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Roman period has given us a density of archaeological remains that remains unsurpassed in world history, and these have been studied since the very birth of archaeology. As a result, Roman archaeology allows us to explore questions that historians and archaeologists of other periods often cannot. Within this rich body of archaeological evidence, this course will focus on key themes and material for the Roman period in Italy and the Western provinces (especially Gaul and Britain). Central topics include imperialism, urbanism, economy, and social life. What was the archaeological imprint of conquest? How did goods travel around such a wide geographical expanse? What images did people in Britain have of the emperor? We will investigate particular types of evidence, from public monuments over ceramic amphorae to the road system. And we will explore methodological issues, such as what archaeological evidence can tell us, or how to introduce protagonists other than emperors and armies in our reconstructions of the Roman world. Throughout the course, we will question whether the modern world is a productive and valid parallel for archaeological study of the Roman world.
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GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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LATIN 3203 : Roman Poetry
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic:TBD.
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LATIN 3204 : Roman Prose
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: TBD.
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LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3396 : Advanced Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: SANSK 3302 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Selected readings in Sanskrit literary and philosophical texts.
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CLASS 3645 : The Tragic Theatre
Crosslisted as: COML 3440, PMA 3724 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Tragedy and its audiences from ancient Greece to modern theater and film. Topics: origins of theatrical conventions; Shakespeare and Seneca; tragedy in modern theater and film. Works studied will include: Aeschylus' Agamemnon; Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, Philoctetes; Euripides' Alcestis, Helen, Iphigeneia in Aulis, Orestes; Seneca's Thyestes, Trojan Women; Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Titus Andronicus, Othello; Strindberg's The Father; Durrenmatt's The Visit; Bergman's Seventh Seal; Cacoyannis' Iphigeneia.
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CLASS 3669 : Plato
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3202 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
We will study several of Plato's major dialogues, including the Apology, the Meno, Phaedo, and Republic. Topics include knowledge and reality; morality and happiness; and the nature of the soul.
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CLASS 3674 : Introduction to Indian Philosophy
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3344, PHIL 3930, RELST 3344 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will survey the rich and sophisticated tradition of Indian philosophical thought from its beginnings in the speculations of Upanishads, surveying debates between Hindus, Buddhists, Jains and materialistic philosophers about the existence and nature of God and of the human soul, the nature of knowledge, and the theory of language.
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CLASS 3675 : Democracy and its Discontents
Crosslisted as: AMST 3678, GOVT 3675 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A historical introduction to democratic theory through the writings of its greatest thinkers and their critics. Beginning with a study of the theory and practice of democratic rule in ancient Athens, we will explore continuities and innovations in democratic thinking in the revolutionary context of the Enlightenment, nineteenth-century social theory, and postcolonial responses to the consequences of the global hegemony of representational democracy in the twentieth century. Topics and themes we will consider include the value of democracy, the nature of equality, the duties and virtues of citizenship, the role of rhetoric and persuasion in democratic politics, the relationship between sovereignty and representation, and the politics of revolution. Lectures will be organized around both historical context and close reading of texts.
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CLASS 3676 : Ancient Political Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3736 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course explores Ancient Greek and Roman political theory. We study key texts of thinkers such as Sophocles, Aristophanes Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero, to learn about differing constitutional forms and the source and authority of law, and also about justice, equality, and power, politics and morality, and politics and religion. Through the writings of dramatists, historians, philosophers, and politicians, we explore fundamental questions of political thought in their historical context (5th century BCE - 5th century CE) and also with a view to their ongoing relevance for contemporary political life.  
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CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3710 : Humans and the Ancient Mediterranean Environment
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3710, ARKEO 7710, CLASS 7710, NES 3610, NES 7710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The Eastern Mediterranean is an ecologically diverse and varied landscape with a rich cultural heritage for studying long-term human-environmental interactions.  In this course we will explore how human activities such as mining, logging, water management, agriculture, and animal husbandry in antiquity impacted the area's environment, as well as how past pollution, disease, and sanitation affected human health.  We will investigate different environmental case studies spanning the last 10,000 years in the East Mediterranean, and their relationship to the area's modern environmental issues.  Particular emphasis will be made on examining how paleoecological, geomorphological, archaeological, and textual evidence may be used together to reconstruct past human-environmental interactions.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore their own topics of interest in Mediterranean environmental history.
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CLASS 3712 : Archaeological Perspectives on the Rural Landscape
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3712, ARKEO 7712, CLASS 7712 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This class overviews perspectives relevant to an archaeological understanding of ancient and pre-modern rural landscapes. During this course the students will engage with (a) textual evidence that describes agricultural methods as well as social relations surrounding peasants and farmers in the classical world, (b) anthropological studies exploring the urban/rural dynamics, (c) sociological studies ranging from Wolf's seminal Peasants to more recent ethnographic studies focusing on the Mediterranean, (d) archaeological methods implemented in the reconstruction of past environment and landscapes (palaeobotany, Geographic Information Systems).
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CLASS 3727 : Iconography of Greek Myth
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3130, ARTH 3230 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Myths are traditional tales. Their authority becomes apparent in that they were constantly adapted to changing social, political, cultural, etc. conditions. Although this seems to be a widely accepted definition so far, it is deeply influenced by Greek tradition. Not only is the term mythos (word, tale) Greek, but the ubiquity of Greek gods, heroes, and their deeds in ancient literature and material culture has given myths an importance they might not have had in other cultures. This class will give an overview of the most important Greek myths and mythological figures as depicted in Greek and Roman times. The chronological frame will range from the seventh century bc to the third century ad. We will discuss the iconography of the Olympian gods and their escorts; of myths such as the loves of the gods; the battles between the Olympian Gods and the Giants, between Greeks and Amazons as well as between Lapiths and Centaurs; the Trojan War; the adventures of Odysseus; the heroic deeds of Heracles, Theseus and Perseus among others. By analyzing where and when mythological images were on display it will become clear how myths were adapted to their specific context as well as why certain myths were more often depicted or more popular than others.
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CLASS 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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CLASS 3750 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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GREEK 4455 : Greek Dialects
Crosslisted as: GREEK 7455, LING 4455, LING 6455 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The features and genetic relationships of the major dialects of ancient Greek, supplemented by the reading and analysis of representative epigraphical and literary texts.
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CLASS 4602 : The Body's Edge in Performance
Crosslisted as: COML 4785, PMA 4965, SHUM 4612 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines how skin and bodily margins in drama, performance art, and film shape the way we understand the human and its markers of identity, from the strange carapace that Oedipus presents in the ancient Theater of Dionysus to the "skin suspensions" of the post-body performance artist Stelarc. Readings and viewings include plays from the ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern periods; films by Peter Greenaway, Jenny Livingston, and Jim Jarmusch; and performances by Karen Finley and Marina Abramovic. We will explore concepts such as Julia Kristeva's abjection, Antonin Artaud's "theater of cruelty," and Georges Bataille's "visions of excess," as different ways of approaching what lies at and beyond the edges of the human.
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CLASS 4632 : Data Corruption's Deep History
Crosslisted as: COML 4615, MEDVL 4718, SHUM 4618, STS 4618 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 4670 : Archaeology of the Phoenicians
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4550, JWST 4550, NES 4550, NES 6550 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The Phoenicians have long been an enigma, a people defined by distant voices. Originating from present-day Lebanon, they were Semitic speakers, renowned seafarers and transmitters of an innovative alphabet that transformed how Mediterranean and Near Eastern folk wrote their languages. Having left us virtually no texts of their own, their history has resembled a patchwork of recollections from Old Testament and Hellenistic times. Recent archaeological discoveries, however, reveal patterns of trade, colonization and socioeconomic transformations that make the Phoenicians less enigmatic while raising new questions. Our class explores the third and second millennium Canaanite roots of the Phoenicians, as well as the Biblical and Greco-Roman perceptions of their early first millennium heyday. We will explore the Phoenician homeland and its colonies, and investigate their maritime economy, language, and religion through both archaeological and textual sources. Temporally the focus is on Phoenician rather than Carthaginian or Punic history, thus up to about 550 BCE. The class has a seminar format involving critical discussions and presentations of scholarly readings, and requires a research paper.
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CLASS 4675 : Greek and Roman Historiography
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7675, HIST 4675, HIST 6675 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Rather than a survey of the history of ancient Greek and Rome, a study of the major ancient authors (from Herodotus through Ammianus Marcellinus) who invented and developed the genres of historical writing. We will examine their philosophical and educational aims, concepts of historical causation, demarcation of subject matter, as well as conventions and sub genres of historiography in antiquity, and critics of historical styles and approaches. All readings in English.
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CLASS 4677 : Desert Monasticism
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4557, NES 4557, RELST 4557 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How and why do landscapes come to inspire the religious imagination? And how do sensory landscapes, more specifically-territories of sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell-inform, inflect, and engage the religious imagination? When and why do religious practices, rituals, traditions, and beliefs inhabit particular landscapes? This seminar treats these questions by focusing on a particular landscape-the "desert," both imagined and real-as it has shaped religious ascetic practice. Biblical notions of howling desert wastelands and subsequent ideas about deserts inhabited by terrifying and grotesque demons; paradise, a garden where angels' wings whir and pure light shines; valleys of rattling dry bones, sinews, and skins that breathe with new life; heavens clanging with the sound of war between seven-headed dragons and angels; demons coming in the forms of roaring lions and hissing serpents-the religious imaginary is shaped in striking ways by sensory landscapes. We will read widely from desert Christian monastic literatures, mostly from late ancient Egypt, to explore both the historical development of monasticism in Christianity and examine why the monastic impulse seems so closely tied to the "desert." In addition to reading saints lives, we will read early monastic rules, the desert fathers, and we will draw from archaeological sources to examine the varieties of ascetic practices in the deserts of late ancient Egypt, Gaza, Sinai, Palestine, and Syria. Throughout the course we will explore ancient and modern ideas about "wilderness" and we will explore parallels between ancient Near Eastern literatures and their nineteenth- and twentieth-century parallels in the American frontier and environmental literatures.
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CLASS 4679 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7679, HIST 4345, HIST 6345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor.
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CLASS 4721 : Honors: Senior Essay I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
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CLASS 4722 : Honors: Senior Essay II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
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CLASS 4753 : Medieval Cosmologies: Text, Image, and Music
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4352, ARTH 6352, CLASS 7753, MEDVL 4352, MEDVL 6352, MUSIC 4352, NES 4352, NES 6352, RELST 4352, RELST 6352, STS 4352, STS 6352, VISST 4352 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Cosmology can be understood as the search for order in the universe, for an underlying logic that structures and renders intelligible the raw chaos of sensory experience. In this sense, the production of cosmologies is not only a scientific or theoretical enterprise, but also has direct implications for religion, politics, and social ideology. We will adopt a broad approach to the study of the dominant cosmological models in the medieval Mediterranean (ca. 500-1500 C.E.), considering both their sources (Greco-Roman science, mythology, revealed religion, etc.) and their expressions in literature, art, and music.
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GREEK 6101 : Advanced Readings in Greek Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
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GREEK 6116 : Advanced Greek Composition
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Study of advanced Greek syntax and practice in composition of Greek sentences and paragraphs.
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LATIN 6202 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Topic: TBD.
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CLASS 6738 : Networks in Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6738, ARKEO 6738, NES 6638 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
It has become impossible to conceive of the world in which we live without networks. Our social circles have become so connected that only 'six degrees of separation' stand between you and any other person on earth. Computers and the internet enable instant communication. And both people and goods can travel across the globe in short time spans. Are networks a strictly modern phenomenon, or did they exist in the ancient world as well? Can thinking in terms of networks shed new light on the nature of the ancient world? Or does our modern reliance on relational thought cloud our view of the specificity of the past?
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CLASS 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
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GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
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CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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LATIN 7201 : Latin for Teachers of Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A systematic treatment of the phonological, morphological and synyactic structure of Classical Latin intended to give prospective teachers of the language additional tools for explaining its forms and constructions to students in the elementary course.  Attention also to strategies for initial presentation of various aspects of the basic grammar of the language to a class of beginners.
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LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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LATIN 7271 : Graduate Seminar in Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Topic: TBD.
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LATIN 7272 : Graduate Seminar in Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A graduate seminar in Latin.
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CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
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CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
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CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
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GREEK 7455 : Greek Dialects
Crosslisted as: GREEK 4455, LING 4455, LING 6455 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The features and genetic relationships of the major dialects of ancient Greek, supplemented by the reading and analysis of representative epigraphical and literary texts.
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CLASS 7675 : Greek and Roman Historiography
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4675, HIST 4675, HIST 6675 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Rather than a survey of the history of ancient Greek and Rome, a study of the major ancient authors (from Herodotus through Ammianus Marcellinus) who invented and developed the genres of historical writing. We will examine their philosophical and educational aims, concepts of historical causation, demarcation of subject matter, as well as conventions and sub genres of historiography in antiquity, and critics of historical styles and approaches. All source readings available in English (there will be an optional separate meeting for those wishing to read some texts in the original); but ability to read secondary literature in a modern European language is desirable and will assist greatly with the final research paper. Some previous coursework in either Greek or Latin history or literature is desirable.
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CLASS 7679 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4679, HIST 4345, HIST 6345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor.
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CLASS 7710 : Humans and the Ancient Mediterranean Environment
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3710, ARKEO 7710, CLASS 3710, NES 3610, NES 7710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The Eastern Mediterranean is an ecologically diverse and varied landscape with a rich cultural heritage for studying long-term human-environmental interactions.  In this course we will explore how human activities such as mining, logging, water management, agriculture, and animal husbandry in antiquity impacted the area's environment, as well as how past pollution, disease, and sanitation affected human health.  We will investigate different environmental case studies spanning the last 10,000 years in the East Mediterranean, and their relationship to the area's modern environmental issues.  Particular emphasis will be made on examining how paleoecological, geomorphological, archaeological, and textual evidence may be used together to reconstruct past human-environmental interactions.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore their own topics of interest in Mediterranean environmental history.
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CLASS 7712 : Archaeological Perspectives on the Rural Landscape
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3712, ARKEO 7712, CLASS 3712 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This class overviews perspectives relevant to an archaeological understanding of ancient and pre-modern rural landscapes. During this course the students will engage with (a) textual evidence that describes agricultural methods as well as social relations surrounding peasants and farmers in the classical world, (b) anthropological studies exploring the urban/rural dynamics, (c) sociological studies ranging from Wolf's seminal Peasants to more recent ethnographic studies focusing on the Mediterranean, (d) archaeological methods implemented in the reconstruction of past environment and landscapes (palaeobotany, Geographic Information Systems).
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CLASS 7734 : The Ancient Senses
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6734 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will take advantage of new scholarship on the history of the senses to explore Greek and Roman culture through the perceptual capacities of the body. We will examine ancient theories of embodiment and sense-perception (with a special focus on Aristotle), as well as the ways in which cultural artefacts invited, modeled, examined, or problematized sensory relations between humans and their environments. From the hero's voice in Greek tragedy to the smells of urban Rome, and from visions of the gods to the textural qualities of language, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach. There will be a special focus on sound, in order to prepare students who may wish to take part in the 2017 CorHaLi conference at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Nafplio, Greece, but the course is open to anyone with an interest in historical approaches to the senses. Special guests will visit our seminars, including Shane Butler, Chair of Classics at Johns Hopkins University, author of The Ancient Phonograph and editor of the Routledge series, The Senses in Antiquity.
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CLASS 7743 : Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7743, NES 7743 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The conquests and death of Alexander served as catalysts for major cultural transformation. Throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Greco-Macedonian dynasties came to rule over foreign populations, establishing elements of Greek culture in places as diverse as Egypt, the Near East, Central Asia, and northwestern India. The resulting cultural interactions led not only to the creation of new, hybrid practices, but also new definitions of "Hellenicity." This seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of the cultural and historical developments of the Hellenistic period, with a particular emphasis on settlement archaeology and material culture. Chronologically, we will cover the period from Alexander's death in 323 BCE to the Battle of Actium in 31 BCE, when Octavian defeated Cleopatra VII to conquer the last remaining Hellenistic kingdom. We will examine the interactions between Greek and local cultures throughout the Hellenistic Mediterranean, considering material culture and iconography from both elite and popular contexts. We will also examine a range of different Hellenistic settlements, including the capital cities Alexandria and Pergamon; the important trading port of Delos; the well-preserved city of Priene; the Thessalian town of New Halos; the remote Bactrian city of Ai Khanum, in what is now Afghanistan; and the Egyptian city of Thebes, a site of frequent indigenous resistance to Greco-Macedonian rule.
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CLASS 7753 : Medieval Cosmologies: Text, Image, and Music
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4352, ARTH 6352, CLASS 4753, MEDVL 4352, MEDVL 6352, MUSIC 4352, NES 4352, NES 6352, RELST 4352, RELST 6352, STS 4352, STS 6352, VISST 4352 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Cosmology can be understood as the search for order in the universe, for an underlying logic that structures and renders intelligible the raw chaos of sensory experience. In this sense, the production of cosmologies is not only a scientific or theoretical enterprise, but also has direct implications for religion, politics, and social ideology. We will adopt a broad approach to the study of the dominant cosmological models in the medieval Mediterranean (ca. 500-1500 C.E.), considering both their sources (Greco-Roman science, mythology, revealed religion, etc.) and their expressions in literature, art, and music.
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GREEK 7910 : Independent Study in Greek
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent study for graduate students only.
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LATIN 7920 : Independent Study in Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent study for graduate students only.
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CLASS 7950 : Independent Study in Sanskrit
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent study for graduate students only.
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CLASS 7960 : Independent Study in Classical Studies
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Independent study for graduate students only.
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