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GREEK 1102 : Elementary Ancient Greek II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of GREEK 1101, prepares students for GREEK 2101.
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LATIN 1202 : Elementary Latin II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of LATIN 1201, using readings from various authors; prepares students for LATIN 1205.
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LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
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CLASS 1332 : Elementary Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 1132, SANSK 1132 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
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CLASS 1531 : FWS: Greek Myth
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and six essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
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CLASS 1538 : FWS: Gods and Mortals in Ancient Egypt
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course prepares students for university-level academic writing through the study of ancient Egyptian religion. We will investigate the ways that beliefs and rituals connected ancient Egyptians to the gods, the dead, the animal world, and the wider cosmos, and we will explore the evidence for Egyptian "myths" and "mythology." Through learning to use Egyptian literature, art, and archaeological artifacts as evidence for ancient religious practices, students will improve their skills in academic research and writing. Assignments include preparatory writing and essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
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CLASS 1699 : English Words: Histories and Mysteries
Crosslisted as: LING 1109 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Where do the words we use come from? This course examines the history and structure of the English vocabulary from its distant Indo-European roots to the latest in technical jargon and slang. Topics include formal and semantic change, taboo and euphemism, borrowing, new words from old, "learned" English loans from Greek and Latin, slang, and society.
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CLASS 1702 : Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 1702, NES 1602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.
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GREEK 2103 : Homer
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Selected readings from Epics.
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LATIN 2205 : Virgil
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students in this course will read selections of Virgil's Aeneid in Latin, and the entire epic in English translation.
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LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Despite the tendency to construe analogies between Latin and mathematics, logic, and word games, Latin remains what it has always been: a language. This means that one cannot lay claim to a sufficient mastery of Latin qua language until one has acquired some oral skills. At the same time, unlike a modern language, the goal of spoken Latin is not conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction allows one to experience the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of the language actively and not just passively. This will in turn enhance reading comprehension. Thus this course will always draw inspiration from real authors and real texts, including Plautus, Cicero, Jerome, Erasmus, and many others.
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CLASS 2352 : Intermediate Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 2252, SANSK 2252 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
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CLASS 2613 : New Testament/Early Christian Literatures
Crosslisted as: JWST 2629, NES 2629, RELST 2629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a literary and historical introduction to the earliest Christian writings, especially those that eventually came to be included in the New Testament.  Through the lens of the Gospel narratives and earliest Christian letters, especially those of Paul, we will explore the rich diversity of the early Christian movement from its Jewish roots in first-century Palestine through its development and spread to Asia Minor and beyond.   We will give careful consideration to the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious circumstances that gave rise to the Jesus movement, as well as those that facilitated the emergence of various manifestations of Christian belief and practice.   The course will address themes like identity and ethnicity, conversion and debate, race and slavery, gender and sexuality, and the connections between politics and religion.
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CLASS 2651 : The Comic Theater
Crosslisted as: COML 2230, PMA 2635 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Study and analysis of 2500 years of comedy (all in English), from Greece (Aristophanes, Menander), Rome (Plautus and Terence), Italy (Machiavelli, The commedia dell' arte), Elizabethan (Shakespeare, Ben Jonson) and Restoration (Congreve, Wycherley) England, France (Molière), Hollywood (Keystone and Hal Roach studios, Screwball comedies of the 30's, Sitcoms) and others besides.
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CLASS 2680 : War and Peace in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: HIST 2560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In ancient Greece and Rome, government did little besides wage war and raise taxes, culture focused on war, warriors gloried in battle, and civilians tried to get out of the way. This course surveys the impact of war and the rarity of peace in the ancient world. Topics include: "why war?"; the face of battle; leadership; strategy, operations, and tactics; women and war; intelligence and information-gathering; diplomacy and peacemaking; militarism; war and slavery; the archaeology of warfare. Readings in translation include selections from Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Josephus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. (pre-1800/non-US)
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CLASS 2687 : Introduction to Military History
Crosslisted as: HIST 2321 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to basic themes of military history, e.g., battle, strategy, tactics, war and society, as well as classic works, e.g. Sun Tzu, Thucydides, Clausewitz, Jomini.  Recent theories in scholarship will also be emphasized.
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CLASS 2689 : Roman History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7689, HIST 2689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the prehistoric settlements on the site of Rome to the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century and its revival in the East with Byzantium. Lectures will provide a narrative and interpretations of major issues, including: empire building, cultural unity and diversity, religious transformations, changing relations between state and society. Discussion section will be the opportunity to engage with important texts, ancient and modern, about Rome.
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CLASS 2729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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CLASS 2808 : The Animal in Greek Literature and Thought: Friend, Foe, or Food?
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did the Ancient Greeks understand the world of non-human animals around them as they hunted, sacrificed, consumed, and worshipped? In this course we will read examine ancient attitudes toward animals through Greek literature, history, and philosophy. Topics of our study will include animal consciousness, human-animal relationships, animals as literary characters, and animal ethics, drawn from such authors as: Homer, Aesop, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Aristotle, and Plutarch.  We will also examine modern animal studies in conjunction with our ancient texts, reading from contemporary theorists on this topic.  As well as reading a diverse body of primary ancient material, students in this course develop their critical reading, research, analytical writing, and discussion skills.
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CLASS 2810 : Wine Culture
Crosslisted as: VIEN 2810 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the complex interactions between wine and culture. From a source of nutrition to an enduring cultural symbol of the good life, a religious ritual to a forbidden substance, an artistic muse to a political pawn, the role of wine has varied through time and among cultures. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and activities, students will analyze how wine has impacted civilizations throughout history and how, in turn, cultures impact the production and consumption of wine.
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GREEK 3102 : Greek Historiography and Oratory
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: Herodotus and Thucydides.
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GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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LATIN 3203 : Roman Poetry
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: Propertius.
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LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3629 : Greek New Testament Readings
Crosslisted as: JWST 3629, NES 3629, RELST 3629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A weekly seminar that may be taken in addition to NES 2629. The seminar will provide an opportunity to read portions of the New Testament and other early Christian writings in Greek. We will work on grammatical and textual issues as well as other problems related to translations.
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CLASS 3646 : The Art of Subversive Writing
Crosslisted as: COML 3460 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Writers are often unable to treat the most deeply controversial issues within their societies persuasively and safely by direct and open challenge, especially in ages and cultures which enforce conformity to some political, religious, or sexual norm. This course examines the literary and rhetorical techniques, formulated in the Greco-Roman antiquity and employed by writers and musicians for over two millennia, to express obliquely what may not be expressed overtly, with special attention to Imperial Rome (Plutarch, Quintilian, Demetrius), Victorian England (W.S. Gilbert), the post-World War II Americas and Europe (Frank Baum, Dalton Trumbo, Friedrich Durrenmatt, Czeslaw Milosz, Theodorakis, Abram Tertz, Jorge Luis Borges, and Vinicius de Moraes), and in selected movies (including Spartacus and Z).
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CLASS 3664 : Aristotle
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3203 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We will study several of Aristotle's major works, including the Categories, Physics, Posterior Analytics, Metaphysics, and Nicomachean Ethics. Topics include nature and change, form and matter, the nature of happiness, the nature of the soul, and knowledge and first principles.
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CLASS 3676 : Ancient Political Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3736 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores Ancient Greek and Roman political theory. We study key texts of thinkers such as Sophocles, Aristophanes Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero, to learn about differing constitutional forms and the source and authority of law, and also about justice, equality, and power, politics and morality, and politics and religion. Through the writings of dramatists, historians, philosophers, and politicians, we explore fundamental questions of political thought in their historical context (5th century BCE - 5th century CE) and also with a view to their ongoing relevance for contemporary political life.  
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CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3735 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3225, ARTH 3225 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
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CLASS 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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GREEK 4411 : Greek Comparative Grammar
Crosslisted as: GREEK 7411, LING 4451, LING 6451 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of ancient Greek as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.
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CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 4665 : Augustine
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 6210, PHIL 4210, PHIL 6210, RELST 4665 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An examination of Augustine's wide-ranging reflections on the nature of mind, giving special attention to his later, major works: Confessions, De trinitate, and De genesi ad litteram.
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CLASS 4722 : Honors: Senior Essay II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
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CLASS 4744 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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CLASS 4755 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Situated on the west coast of Anatolia (or Asia Minor), modern Turkey, Ephesos was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from the 7th century BCE to the 14th century CE, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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LATIN 6202 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
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LATIN 6216 : Advanced Latin Prose Composition
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This advanced Latin prose composition course is for graduate students.
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CLASS 6702 : Geographic Information Systems Approaches to Ancient Landscapes
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will provide a theoretical grounding and practical experience with uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for studying ancient landscapes. The course attends to the complexities of creating, managing and analyzing spatial data from archaeological surveys and excavations. Topics include critical discussions on how data are defined and how they relate to other data (ontology), as well as approaches to spatial data collection, (big data) management and analysis. During this course students will also overview a range of commercial and Open Source software through practical exercises. Students will finally apply insights gained by practicing analytical techniques to draw informed historical and archaeological conclusions.
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GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
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GREEK 7172 : Graduate Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
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CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
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CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
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GREEK 7411 : Greek Comparative Grammar
Crosslisted as: GREEK 4411, LING 4451, LING 6451 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of ancient Greek as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.
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CLASS 7689 : Roman History: Approaches and Methods
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2689, HIST 2689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Offers a survey of Roman history, 700 BCE-500 CE in the lectures and both an introduction to the different disciplines studying the non-literary sources for Roman history (epigraphy, archaeology, among others) and a discussion of important topics relevant to Roman social history (travel, voluntary associations, death and burial, etc) in the discussion section.
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CLASS 7727 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 2729 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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CLASS 7744 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7755 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Situated on the west coast of Anatolia (or Asia Minor), modern Turkey, Ephesos was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from the 7th century BCE to the 14th century CE, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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CLASS 7756 : The Roman Economy
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7756 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did a large-scale pre-industrial empire like the Roman feed its citizens? How were its consumer goods produced and traded? How did town and countryside engage in this trade? Can we detect economic growth in the Roman world? What was the role of standardization? Was the Roman economy anything like the modern one, and can we use modern economic theory to study its dynamics? This course examines central questions in the study of the Roman economy, with a particular emphasis on theoretical and epistemological assumptions, and on assessing the potential of different types of evidence.
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