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GREEK 1101 : Elementary Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction to Attic Greek. Designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.
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GREEK 1102 : Elementary Ancient Greek II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of GREEK 1101, prepares students for GREEK 2101.
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LATIN 1201 : Elementary Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.
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LATIN 1202 : Elementary Latin II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of LATIN 1201, using readings from various authors; prepares students for LATIN 1205.
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LATIN 1204 : Latin in Review
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Provides a comprehensive but streamlined review of the forms and syntax typically covered in LATIN 1201 and LATIN 1202 or a comparable first-year Latin sequence. It begins with a quick review of the most basic grammar and continues at a more deliberate pace with second-term material (LATIN 1202). The final part of the course is devoted to the reading of unchanged selections from Classical Latin authors as a transition to the study of Latin literary texts in more advanced courses. For students who receive an A- or higher, the sequence is continued by LATIN 2201; those who receive a B+ or lower should continue with LATIN 1205.
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LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
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LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
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CLASS 1331 : Elementary Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 1131, SANSK 1131 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
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CLASS 1332 : Elementary Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 1132, SANSK 1132 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
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CLASS 1515 : FWS: Great Roman Inventions
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
What do the book, blown glass, the calendar, and concrete have in common? Our modern world would not be imaginable without them, from the ability to schedule meetings to the construction of New York's skyscrapers. But they also have something else in common: all of these were Roman inventions. How did such new concepts come into being? What was it about the historical context of the Roman empire that facilitated their development? And how did they become building blocks of our modern world? While exploring these questions, the seminar will dissect the different stages and strategies of writing, which students will practice through six essays of different length and scope.
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CLASS 1531 : FWS: Greek Myth
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and six essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
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CLASS 1615 : Introduction to Ancient Rome
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Ancient Rome was a village the size of Ithaca that grew into a world empire. In this course students will be introduced to some of its literature, art, and famous personalities in the classical period (2nd c. BCE – 2nd c. CE). In it we will read the masterpieces of Latin literature, from Virgil's Aeneid to Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Catullus' lyrics to Livy's moralizing History of Rome. Special attention will be given to the late republic and Augustan period. No prior knowledge of the ancient world is necessary. All readings are in English.
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CLASS 1699 : English Words: Histories and Mysteries
Crosslisted as: LING 1109 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Where do the words we use come from? This course examines the history and structure of the English vocabulary from its distant Indo-European roots to the latest in technical jargon and slang. Topics include formal and semantic change, taboo and euphemism, borrowing, new words from old, "learned" English loans from Greek and Latin, slang, and society.
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CLASS 1702 : Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 1702, NES 1602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.
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GREEK 2101 : Intermediate Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to Greek prose by reading Plato's Crito and selections from Xenophon's recollections of Socrates. Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in GREEK 1102.
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GREEK 2103 : Homer
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Selected readings from Epics.
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LATIN 2201 : Latin Prose
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Readings from Cicero's Philippics - his fierce denunciations of Mark Antony, delivered after the assassination of Julius Caesar. We will read these speeches with close attention to their rhetorical style and historical context, discovering the reasons for their political potency, which led directly to Cicero's own politically-motivated murder.
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LATIN 2205 : Virgil
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students in this course will read selections of Virgil's Aeneid in Latin, and the entire epic in English translation.
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LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Despite the tendency to construe analogies between Latin and mathematics, logic, and word games, Latin remains what it has always been: a language. This means that one cannot lay claim to a sufficient mastery of Latin qua language until one has acquired some oral skills. At the same time, unlike a modern language, the goal of spoken Latin is not conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction allows one to experience the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of the language actively and not just passively. This will in turn enhance reading comprehension. Thus this course will always draw inspiration from real authors and real texts, including Plautus, Cicero, Jerome, Erasmus, and many others.
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LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Despite the tendency to construe analogies between Latin and mathematics, logic, and word games, Latin remains what it has always been: a language. This means that one cannot lay claim to a sufficient mastery of Latin qua language until one has acquired some oral skills. At the same time, unlike a modern language, the goal of spoken Latin is not conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction allows one to experience the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of the language actively and not just passively. This will in turn enhance reading comprehension. Thus this course will always draw inspiration from real authors and real texts, including Plautus, Cicero, Jerome, Erasmus, and many others.
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CLASS 2351 : Intermediate Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 2251, SANSK 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
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CLASS 2352 : Intermediate Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 2252, SANSK 2252 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
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CLASS 2601 : The Greek Experience
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduces students to the literature and intellectual life of ancient Greece from Homer to the early centuries of Roman rule. We will read and discuss ancient writers as creative artists in their own right, to develop a clearer sense of what the Greeks themselves sought to express, rather than as sources for a synthetic modern overview of antiquity. Among our texts will be Homer's Odyssey, Greek lyric poetry, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and Lucian, set against a backdrop of Greek geography, history, and art. No knowledge of Ancient Greece (or Greek) is either assumed or required. Texts will be read in English translation. But students wishing to read parts of any assigned works in the original may apply do so independently with the instructor for additional credit.
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CLASS 2603 : Initiation to Greek Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Limited to 18 students. Intended especially for first-year students. Students must apply in writing to chair, Department of Classics, 120 Goldwin Smith Hall. No prior knowledge necessary (all texts are in translation). What is necessary is a willingness to participate actively in two seminar meetings each week and occasional supplementary workshops with specially invited guests. This course covers a wide range of Greek literary and philosophical works as well as modern critical and philosophical writings. The focus throughout is on the status of language, the many forms of discourse that appear in the literature, and the attempts the Greeks themselves made to grapple with the challenges inherent in language as the medium of poetry and philosophy. The course inquires into the intellectual development of a culture infused with traditional, mythological accounts of the cosmos. It asks how poetic forms such as tragedy engage with philosophical discourse while creating intense emotional effects on audiences both during antiquity and beyond.
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CLASS 2604 : Greek Mythology
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Survey of the Greek myths, with emphasis on the content and significance of the myths in Mediterranean society, including the place of myth in Greek life and consciousness; the factors and influences involved in the creation of myths; and the use of myths for our understanding of Greek literature, religion, and moral and political concepts.
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CLASS 2605 : Theater, Sport, and Spectacle: Performance and Competition in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: PMA 2605 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A study of the richly documented tradition of competitive artistic, athletic, and spectacular performances sponsored by cities, wealthy individuals, and kings/emperors in antiquity, with special attention to the ongoing connections and cross-influences between music/theater, athletics, and human/animal combats. We will take our comparative material from the fifth century bce to the late Roman empire. Topics include organizational frameworks, funding sources, associations of performers and their ideologies and rivalries, regulation and hierarchies of audiences, public claques, the adaptation of performance to political events, influence on art, and institutional and intellectual opposition. Evidence will include ancient treatises, inscriptions, mosaics, wall-paintings, and terracottas; all source readings available in English.
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CLASS 2613 : New Testament/Early Christian Literatures
Crosslisted as: JWST 2629, NES 2629, RELST 2629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a literary and historical introduction to the earliest Christian writings, most of which eventually came to be included in the New Testament. Through the lens of the gospel narratives and earliest Christian letters, especially those of Paul, the course explores the rich diversity of the early Christian movement, from its Jewish roots in first-century Palestine through its development and spread to Asia Minor and beyond. Careful consideration is given to the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious circumstances that gave rise to the Jesus movement, as well as those that facilitated the emergence of various manifestations of early Christian beliefs and practices. (Students who have had at least one year of Greek and would like to participate in a 1-credit weekly reading seminar should also enroll in NES 3629.)
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CLASS 2630 : Drinking in the Ages: Intoxicating Beverages in Near Eastern and World History
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2522, JWST 2522, NES 2522 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course examines the production and exchange of wine, beer, coffee and tea, and the social and ideological dynamics involved in their consumption. We start in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and end with tea and coffee in the Arab and Ottoman worlds. Archaeological and textual evidence will be used throughout to show the centrality of drinking in daily, ritual and political life.
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CLASS 2651 : The Comic Theater
Crosslisted as: COML 2230, PMA 2635 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Study and analysis of 2500 years of comedy (all in English), from Greece (Aristophanes, Menander), Rome (Plautus and Terence), Italy (Machiavelli, The commedia dell' arte), Elizabethan (Shakespeare, Ben Jonson) and Restoration (Congreve, Wycherley) England, France (Molière), Hollywood (Keystone and Hal Roach studios, Screwball comedies of the 30's, Sitcoms) and others besides.
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CLASS 2661 : Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introductory survey of ancient Greek philosophy from the so-called Presocratics (6th century BCE) through the Hellenistic period (1st century BCE) with special emphasis on the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
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CLASS 2675 : Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander
Crosslisted as: HIST 2650 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.
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CLASS 2680 : War and Peace in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: HIST 2560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In ancient Greece and Rome, government did little besides wage war and raise taxes, culture focused on war, warriors gloried in battle, and civilians tried to get out of the way. This course surveys the impact of war and the rarity of peace in the ancient world. Topics include: "why war?"; the face of battle; leadership; strategy, operations, and tactics; women and war; intelligence and information-gathering; diplomacy and peacemaking; militarism; war and slavery; the archaeology of warfare. Readings in translation include selections from Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Josephus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. (pre-1800/non-US)
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CLASS 2685 : Egyptomania: Imagining Egypt in the Greco-Roman World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2285, ARKEO 2285, NES 2985 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Throughout Greek and Roman history, the idea of Egypt inspired powerful imaginative responses ranging from fascination to fear. This course investigates Egyptian interactions with the Greco-Roman world and the changing Greek and Roman attitudes towards Egypt. Readings will cover subjects including the earliest Egyptian-Aegean trade, Herodotus' accounts of Egypt, Greco-Macedonian kings on the throne of the pharaohs, Roman perceptions of the notorious Cleopatra, the worship of Egyptian gods in the Greco-Roman world, and the incorporation of Egypt into the Roman empire (among other topics). Through an examination of Greek and Roman representations of Egypt, we will investigate how Greeks and Romans conceived of their own societies and cultural identities. Finally, we will also address images of Egypt in modern popular culture; how have Greco-Roman portrayals of Egypt helped shape today's view of the Pharaonic world?
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CLASS 2687 : Introduction to Military History
Crosslisted as: HIST 2321 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to basic themes of military history, e.g., battle, strategy, tactics, war and society, as well as classic works, e.g. Sun Tzu, Thucydides, Clausewitz, Jomini.  Recent theories in scholarship will also be emphasized.
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CLASS 2689 : Roman History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7689, HIST 2689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the prehistoric settlements on the site of Rome to the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century and its revival in the East with Byzantium. Lectures will provide a narrative and interpretations of major issues, including: empire building, cultural unity and diversity, religious transformations, changing relations between state and society. Discussion section will be the opportunity to engage with important texts, ancient and modern, about Rome.
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CLASS 2700 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2700, ARTH 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
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CLASS 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2711, ARTH 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
With megacities, long-distance trade, and fluid identities, the Roman empire can seem uncannily close to our modern world. This course adopts a thematic approach to explore whether this is a valid parallel, based on archaeological evidence ranging from temples to farms, from wine containers to statues. Central topics include imperialism, urbanism, economy, and social life. What was the archaeological imprint of conquest? How did goods travel around such a wide geographical expanse? What images did people in Britain have of the emperor? In investigating these questions, we will explore methodological issues, such as what archaeological evidence can tell us, how to handle and describe objects (with various museum visits!), or how to introduce protagonists other than emperors and armies in our reconstructions of the Roman world. Throughout the course, we will question whether the modern world is a productive and valid parallel for archaeological study of the Roman world.
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CLASS 2729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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CLASS 2808 : The Animal in Greek Literature and Thought: Friend, Foe, or Food?
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did the Ancient Greeks understand the world of non-human animals around them as they hunted, sacrificed, consumed, and worshipped? In this course we will read examine ancient attitudes toward animals through Greek literature, history, and philosophy. Topics of our study will include animal consciousness, human-animal relationships, animals as literary characters, and animal ethics, drawn from such authors as: Homer, Aesop, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Aristotle, and Plutarch.  We will also examine modern animal studies in conjunction with our ancient texts, reading from contemporary theorists on this topic.  As well as reading a diverse body of primary ancient material, students in this course develop their critical reading, research, analytical writing, and discussion skills.
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CLASS 2810 : Wine Culture
Crosslisted as: VIEN 2810 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the complex interactions between wine and culture. From a source of nutrition to an enduring cultural symbol of the good life, a religious ritual to a forbidden substance, an artistic muse to a political pawn, the role of wine has varied through time and among cultures. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and activities, students will analyze how wine has impacted civilizations throughout history and how, in turn, cultures impact the production and consumption of wine.
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GREEK 3102 : Greek Historiography and Oratory
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: Herodotus and Thucydides.
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GREEK 3120 : Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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LATIN 3203 : Roman Poetry
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: Propertius.
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LATIN 3204 : Roman Prose
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Readings from the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, and later authors with particular attention to Latin grammar, epistolary style, and historical context. 
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LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3395 : Advanced Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: SANSK 3301 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Selected readings in Sanskrit literary and philosophical texts.
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CLASS 3629 : Greek New Testament Readings
Crosslisted as: JWST 3629, NES 3629, RELST 3629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A weekly seminar that may be taken in addition to NES 2629. The seminar will provide an opportunity to read portions of the New Testament and other early Christian writings in Greek. We will work on grammatical and textual issues as well as other problems related to translations.
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CLASS 3645 : The Tragic Theatre
Crosslisted as: COML 3440, PMA 3724 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Tragedy and its audiences from ancient Greece to modern theater and film. Topics: origins of theatrical conventions; Shakespeare and Seneca; tragedy in modern theater and film. Works studied will include: Aeschylus' Agamemnon; Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, Philoctetes; Euripides' Alcestis, Helen, Iphigeneia in Aulis, Orestes; Seneca's Thyestes, Trojan Women; Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Titus Andronicus, Othello; Strindberg's The Father; Durrenmatt's The Visit; Bergman's Seventh Seal; Cacoyannis' Iphigeneia.
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CLASS 3646 : The Art of Subversive Writing
Crosslisted as: COML 3460 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Writers are often unable to treat the most deeply controversial issues within their societies persuasively and safely by direct and open challenge, especially in ages and cultures which enforce conformity to some political, religious, or sexual norm. This course examines the literary and rhetorical techniques, formulated in the Greco-Roman antiquity and employed by writers and musicians for over two millennia, to express obliquely what may not be expressed overtly, with special attention to Imperial Rome (Plutarch, Quintilian, Demetrius), Victorian England (W.S. Gilbert), the post-World War II Americas and Europe (Frank Baum, Dalton Trumbo, Friedrich Durrenmatt, Czeslaw Milosz, Theodorakis, Abram Tertz, Jorge Luis Borges, and Vinicius de Moraes), and in selected movies (including Spartacus and Z).
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CLASS 3664 : Aristotle
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3203 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We will study several of Aristotle's major works, including the Categories, Physics, Posterior Analytics, Metaphysics, and Nicomachean Ethics. Topics include nature and change, form and matter, the nature of happiness, the nature of the soul, and knowledge and first principles.
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CLASS 3669 : Plato
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3202 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
We will study several of Plato's major dialogues, including the Apology, the Meno, Phaedo, and Republic. Topics include knowledge and reality; morality and happiness; and the nature of the soul.
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CLASS 3676 : Ancient Political Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3736 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores Ancient Greek and Roman political theory. We study key texts of thinkers such as Sophocles, Aristophanes Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero, to learn about differing constitutional forms and the source and authority of law, and also about justice, equality, and power, politics and morality, and politics and religion. Through the writings of dramatists, historians, philosophers, and politicians, we explore fundamental questions of political thought in their historical context (5th century BCE - 5th century CE) and also with a view to their ongoing relevance for contemporary political life.  
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CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3735 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3225, ARTH 3225 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
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CLASS 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
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CLASS 3750 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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GREEK 4411 : Greek Comparative Grammar
Crosslisted as: GREEK 7411, LING 4451, LING 6451 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of ancient Greek as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.
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CLASS 4632 : Data Corruption's Deep History
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4618, COML 4615, MEDVL 4718, SHUM 4618, STS 4618 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How can studying the deep past of information storage and transmission help us understand our current engagements with information and contemplate its future? In this course we will we will explore the materiality of information-bearing artifacts over the long history of semantic inscription. From cuneiform tablets to digital media (whose veneer of immateriality disguises the complexities of the material mechanisms of storage and transmission), we will study the shifting materialities of the matrices through which information is stored, transformed, shared, and obliterated: compilations and remixes, piracies and hacks, inscribed objects and their digital "surrogates."
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CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 4665 : Augustine
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4210, RELST 4665 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An examination of Augustine's wide-ranging reflections on the nature of mind, giving special attention to his later, major works: Confessions, De trinitate, and De genesi ad litteram.
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CLASS 4677 : Desert Monasticism
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4557, NES 4557, NES 6557, RELST 4557 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
How and why do landscapes come to inspire the religious imagination? And how do sensory landscapes, more specifically-territories of sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell-inform, inflect, and engage the religious imagination? When and why do religious practices, rituals, traditions, and beliefs inhabit particular landscapes? This seminar treats these questions by focusing on a particular landscape-the "desert," both imagined and real-as it has shaped religious ascetic practice. Biblical notions of howling desert wastelands and subsequent ideas about deserts inhabited by terrifying and grotesque demons; paradise, a garden where angels' wings whir and pure light shines; valleys of rattling dry bones, sinews, and skins that breathe with new life; heavens clanging with the sound of war between seven-headed dragons and angels; demons coming in the forms of roaring lions and hissing serpents-the religious imaginary is shaped in striking ways by sensory landscapes. We will read widely from desert Christian monastic literatures, mostly from late ancient Egypt, to explore both the historical development of monasticism in Christianity and examine why the monastic impulse seems so closely tied to the "desert." In addition to reading saints lives, we will read early monastic rules, the desert fathers, and we will draw from archaeological sources to examine the varieties of ascetic practices in the deserts of late ancient Egypt, Gaza, Sinai, Palestine, and Syria. Throughout the course we will explore ancient and modern ideas about "wilderness" and we will explore parallels between ancient Near Eastern literatures and their nineteenth- and twentieth-century parallels in the American frontier and environmental literatures.
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CLASS 4679 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7679, HIST 4345, HIST 6345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor. 
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CLASS 4721 : Honors: Senior Essay I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
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CLASS 4722 : Honors: Senior Essay II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
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CLASS 4742 : Cornell University Classical Archaeology Field School
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 4744 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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CLASS 4755 : Ephesos, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Situated on the west coast of Anatolia (or Asia Minor), modern Turkey, Ephesos was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from the 7th century BCE to the 14th century CE, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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GREEK 6101 : Advanced Readings in Greek Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
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LATIN 6202 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
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CLASS 6702 : Geographic Information Systems Approaches to Ancient Landscapes
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will provide a theoretical grounding and practical experience with uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for studying ancient landscapes. The course attends to the complexities of creating, managing and analyzing spatial data from archaeological surveys and excavations. Topics include critical discussions on how data are defined and how they relate to other data (ontology), as well as approaches to spatial data collection, (big data) management and analysis. During this course students will also overview a range of commercial and Open Source software through practical exercises. Students will finally apply insights gained by practicing analytical techniques to draw informed historical and archaeological conclusions.
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CLASS 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
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GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
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GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
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GREEK 7172 : Graduate Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
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CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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LATIN 7201 : Latin for Teachers of Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A systematic treatment of the phonological, morphological and synyactic structure of Classical Latin intended to give prospective teachers of the language additional tools for explaining its forms and constructions to students in the elementary course.  Attention also to strategies for initial presentation of various aspects of the basic grammar of the language to a class of beginners.
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LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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LATIN 7271 : Graduate Seminar in Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Topic: The refugee problem in Classical Latin literature.
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CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
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CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
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CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
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CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
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CLASS 7347 : Scholarly Writing in Classics
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed as intensive writing seminar that provides graduate students with time, support, and structure for producing a publishable research paper.
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GREEK 7411 : Greek Comparative Grammar
Crosslisted as: GREEK 4411, LING 4451, LING 6451 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of ancient Greek as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.
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CLASS 7679 : Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4679, HIST 4345, HIST 6345 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Alexander and Caesar are still today two of history's greatest conquerors and statesmen. They were each geniuses and visionaries but were also each responsible for death and destruction on a massive scale. Ancient writers often compared the two and so shall we in a course that aims to separate the facts from the legend and to consider each person's legacy for today. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship. Prerequisite: introductory course in ancient history or permission of the instructor.
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CLASS 7689 : Roman History: Approaches and Methods
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2689, HIST 2689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 7727 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 2729 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
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CLASS 7743 : Archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7743, NES 7743 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The conquests and death of Alexander served as catalysts for major cultural transformation. Throughout the Mediterranean and beyond, Greco-Macedonian dynasties came to rule over foreign populations, establishing elements of Greek culture in places as diverse as Egypt, the Near East, Central Asia, and northwestern India. The resulting cultural interactions led not only to the creation of new, hybrid practices, but also new definitions of "Hellenicity." This seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of the cultural and historical developments of the Hellenistic period, with a particular emphasis on settlement archaeology and material culture. Chronologically, we will cover the period from Alexander's death in 323 BCE to the Battle of Actium in 31 BCE, when Octavian defeated Cleopatra VII to conquer the last remaining Hellenistic kingdom. We will examine the interactions between Greek and local cultures throughout the Hellenistic Mediterranean, considering material culture and iconography from both elite and popular contexts.
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CLASS 7744 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will look at archaeological and textual evidence from one of the longest-running excavations in the Near East: the ancient city of Ugarit at Tell Ras Shamra in northwestern Syria. Students will review the archaeological history of this coastal kingdom that has its roots deep in Levantine prehistory. Then we will study the textual material emerging from the thousands of clay tablets inscribed in alphabetic Ugaritic and cuneiform Babylonian that vividly illuminate matters of cult, economy, law, and daily life in a Late Bronze Age city during the 14th -12th centuries BCE. Students will read a sample of these texts, in translation or the original (for credit in 6644), to gain insights into the life of a cosmopolitan center that managed to thrive while surrounded by territorial empires during history's first truly international age.
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CLASS 7755 : Ephesos, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Situated on the west coast of Anatolia (or Asia Minor), modern Turkey, Ephesos was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from the 7th century BCE to the 14th century CE, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
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CLASS 7756 : The Roman Economy
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7756 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did a large-scale pre-industrial empire like the Roman feed its citizens? How were its consumer goods produced and traded? How did town and countryside engage in this trade? Can we detect economic growth in the Roman world? What was the role of standardization? Was the Roman economy anything like the modern one, and can we use modern economic theory to study its dynamics? This course examines central questions in the study of the Roman economy, with a particular emphasis on theoretical and epistemological assumptions, and on assessing the potential of different types of evidence.
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