arrow grid linear view icon
The College of Arts Sciences Search

Current Courses

Sort by: TitleNumber
Filter by:
GREEK 1101 : Elementary Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction to Attic Greek. Designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.
View course details
Description
GREEK 1102 : Elementary Ancient Greek II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of GREEK 1101, prepares students for GREEK 2101.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1201 : Elementary Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1202 : Elementary Latin II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Continuation of LATIN 1201, using readings from various authors; prepares students for LATIN 1205.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1204 : Latin in Review
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Provides a comprehensive but streamlined review of the forms and syntax typically covered in LATIN 1201 and LATIN 1202 or a comparable first-year Latin sequence. It begins with a quick review of the most basic grammar and continues at a more deliberate pace with second-term material (LATIN 1202). The final part of the course is devoted to the reading of unchanged selections from Classical Latin authors as a transition to the study of Latin literary texts in more advanced courses. For students who receive an A- or higher, the sequence is continued by LATIN 2201; those who receive a B+ or lower should continue with LATIN 1205.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Cicero's Pro Milone). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1331 : Elementary Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 1131, SANSK 1131 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1332 : Elementary Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 1132, SANSK 1132 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1531 : FWS: Greek Myth
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and six essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1538 : FWS: Gods and Mortals in Ancient Egypt
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course prepares students for university-level academic writing through the study of ancient Egyptian religion. We will investigate the ways that beliefs and rituals connected ancient Egyptians to the gods, the dead, the animal world, and the wider cosmos, and we will explore the evidence for Egyptian "myths" and "mythology." Through learning to use Egyptian literature, art, and archaeological artifacts as evidence for ancient religious practices, students will improve their skills in academic research and writing. Assignments include preparatory writing and essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1615 : Introduction to Ancient Rome
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Ancient Rome was a village the size of Ithaca that grew into a world empire. In this course students will be introduced to some of its literature, art, and famous personalities in the classical period (2nd c. BCE – 2nd c. CE). In it we will read the masterpieces of Latin literature, from Virgil's Aeneid to Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Catullus' lyrics to Livy's moralizing History of Rome. Special attention will be given to the late republic and Augustan period. No prior knowledge of the ancient world is necessary. All readings are in English.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1632 : Ancient Theater Performance
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is preparation for a performance of ancient theater in the Black Box Theatre at the end of the semester.  It will involve background reading about the play, learning and acting the lines, and preparing the costuming, programming and sets. The play will be selected after auditions among the members of the class are held. All those who receive credits will be acting in the play.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1699 : English Words: Histories and Mysteries
Crosslisted as: LING 1109 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Where do the words we use come from? This course examines the history and structure of the English vocabulary from its distant Indo-European roots to the latest in technical jargon and slang. Topics include formal and semantic change, taboo and euphemism, borrowing, new words from old, "learned" English loans from Greek and Latin, slang, and society.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1702 : Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 1702, NES 1602 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.
View course details
Description
GREEK 2101 : Intermediate Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to Greek prose by reading Plato's Crito and selections from Xenophon's recollections of Socrates. Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in GREEK 1102.
View course details
Description
GREEK 2103 : Homer
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Selected readings from Epics.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2201 : Latin Prose
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Readings from Cicero's Philippics - his fierce denunciations of Mark Antony, delivered after the assassination of Julius Caesar. We will read these speeches with close attention to their rhetorical style and historical context, discovering the reasons for their political potency, which led directly to Cicero's own politically-motivated murder.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2205 : Virgil
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students in this course will read selections of Virgil's Aeneid in Latin, and the entire epic in English translation.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Despite the tendency to construe analogies between Latin and mathematics, logic, and word games, Latin remains what it has always been: a language. This means that one cannot lay claim to a sufficient mastery of Latin qua language until one has acquired some oral skills. At the same time, unlike a modern language, the goal of spoken Latin is not conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction allows one to experience the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of the language actively and not just passively. This will in turn enhance reading comprehension. Thus this course will always draw inspiration from real authors and real texts, including Plautus, Cicero, Jerome, Erasmus, and many others.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Despite the tendency to construe analogies between Latin and mathematics, logic, and word games, Latin remains what it has always been: a language. This means that one cannot lay claim to a sufficient mastery of Latin qua language until one has acquired some oral skills. At the same time, unlike a modern language, the goal of spoken Latin is not conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction allows one to experience the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of the language actively and not just passively. This will in turn enhance reading comprehension. Thus this course will always draw inspiration from real authors and real texts, including Plautus, Cicero, Jerome, Erasmus, and many others.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2351 : Intermediate Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 2251, SANSK 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2352 : Intermediate Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 2252, SANSK 2252 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2601 : The Greek Experience
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduces students to the literature and intellectual life of ancient Greece from Homer to the early centuries of Roman rule. We will read and discuss ancient writers as creative artists in their own right, to develop a clearer sense of what the Greeks themselves sought to express, rather than as sources for a synthetic modern overview of antiquity. Among our texts will be Homer's Odyssey, Greek lyric poetry, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and Lucian, set against a backdrop of Greek geography, history, and art. No knowledge of Ancient Greece (or Greek) is either assumed or required. Texts will be read in English translation. But students wishing to read parts of any assigned works in the original may apply do so independently with the instructor for additional credit.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2603 : Initiation to Greek Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Limited to 18 students. Intended especially for first-year students. Students must apply in writing to chair, Department of Classics, 120 Goldwin Smith Hall. No prior knowledge necessary (all texts are in translation). What is necessary is a willingness to participate actively in two seminar meetings each week and occasional supplementary workshops with specially invited guests. This course covers a wide range of Greek literary and philosophical works as well as modern critical and philosophical writings. The focus throughout is on the status of language, the many forms of discourse that appear in the literature, and the attempts the Greeks themselves made to grapple with the challenges inherent in language as the medium of poetry and philosophy. The course inquires into the intellectual development of a culture infused with traditional, mythological accounts of the cosmos. It asks how poetic forms such as tragedy engage with philosophical discourse while creating intense emotional effects on audiences both during antiquity and beyond.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2604 : Greek Mythology
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Survey of the Greek myths, with emphasis on the content and significance of the myths in Mediterranean society, including the place of myth in Greek life and consciousness; the factors and influences involved in the creation of myths; and the use of myths for our understanding of Greek literature, religion, and moral and political concepts.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2613 : New Testament/Early Christian Literatures
Crosslisted as: JWST 2629, NES 2629, RELST 2629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a literary and historical introduction to the earliest Christian writings, especially those that eventually came to be included in the New Testament.  Through the lens of the Gospel narratives and earliest Christian letters, especially those of Paul, we will explore the rich diversity of the early Christian movement from its Jewish roots in first-century Palestine through its development and spread to Asia Minor and beyond.   We will give careful consideration to the political, economic, social, cultural, and religious circumstances that gave rise to the Jesus movement, as well as those that facilitated the emergence of various manifestations of Christian belief and practice.   The course will address themes like identity and ethnicity, conversion and debate, race and slavery, gender and sexuality, and the connections between politics and religion.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2633 : Sex, Gender, and Identity in Ancient Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2633 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 2651 : The Comic Theater
Crosslisted as: COML 2230, PMA 2635 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Study and analysis of 2500 years of comedy (all in English), from Greece (Aristophanes, Menander), Rome (Plautus and Terence), Italy (Machiavelli, The commedia dell' arte), Elizabethan (Shakespeare, Ben Jonson) and Restoration (Congreve, Wycherley) England, France (Molière), Hollywood (Keystone and Hal Roach studios, Screwball comedies of the 30's, Sitcoms) and others besides.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2661 : Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introductory survey of ancient Greek philosophy from the so-called Presocratics (6th century BCE) through the Hellenistic period (1st century BCE) with special emphasis on the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2675 : Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander
Crosslisted as: HIST 2650 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2680 : War and Peace in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: HIST 2560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In ancient Greece and Rome, government did little besides wage war and raise taxes, culture focused on war, warriors gloried in battle, and civilians tried to get out of the way. This course surveys the impact of war and the rarity of peace in the ancient world. Topics include: "why war?"; the face of battle; leadership; strategy, operations, and tactics; women and war; intelligence and information-gathering; diplomacy and peacemaking; militarism; war and slavery; the archaeology of warfare. Readings in translation include selections from Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Josephus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. (pre-1800/non-US)
View course details
Description
CLASS 2687 : Introduction to Military History
Crosslisted as: HIST 2321 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to basic themes of military history, e.g., battle, strategy, tactics, war and society, as well as classic works, e.g. Sun Tzu, Thucydides, Clausewitz, Jomini.  Recent theories in scholarship will also be emphasized.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2689 : Roman History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7689, HIST 2689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the history of the Roman empire, from the prehistoric settlements on the site of Rome to the fall of the Western empire in the fifth century and its revival in the East with Byzantium. Lectures will provide a narrative and interpretations of major issues, including: empire building, cultural unity and diversity, religious transformations, changing relations between state and society. Discussion section will be the opportunity to engage with important texts, ancient and modern, about Rome.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2700 : Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2700, ARTH 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2729 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 7727 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2801 : Theory and Methods in Classical Studies
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Joins us to explore a lost world of wine and song! The symposium (or "drinking party") was a major social institution within Greek culture - a forum for well-born men (and select female companions) to celebrate victory in athletic and poetic contests, engage in debate, enjoy performances of music and poetry, and honor the god Dionysus. We will explore archaeological evidence for Greek practices of dining and drinking, such as the layout of domestic spaces and Greek practices of viticulture; visual portrayals of symposia, such as those we find in Attic vase-paintings; the social history of dining, including the role of religion and issues of gender and class; the significance of symposia in works of historiography; the role of poetic performance in sympotic contexts; and the relationship between elite sympotic culture and Greek philosophy, most famously in Plato's Symposium. You will thus be introduced to a range of skills and methods employed in archaeology, art history, ancient history, philology and philosophy, which you will find very helpful in your other Classics courses. This course is required of all Classics and Classical Civilization majors, and is taught in alternate years. Non-Classics majors are also very welcome.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2803 : Comparative Slaveries
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 2808 : The Animal in Greek Literature and Thought: Friend, Foe, or Food?
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did the Ancient Greeks understand the world of non-human animals around them as they hunted, sacrificed, consumed, and worshipped? In this course we will read examine ancient attitudes toward animals through Greek literature, history, and philosophy. Topics of our study will include animal consciousness, human-animal relationships, animals as literary characters, and animal ethics, drawn from such authors as: Homer, Aesop, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Aristotle, and Plutarch.  We will also examine modern animal studies in conjunction with our ancient texts, reading from contemporary theorists on this topic.  As well as reading a diverse body of primary ancient material, students in this course develop their critical reading, research, analytical writing, and discussion skills.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2810 : Wine Culture
Crosslisted as: VIEN 2810 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the complex interactions between wine and culture. From a source of nutrition to an enduring cultural symbol of the good life, a religious ritual to a forbidden substance, an artistic muse to a political pawn, the role of wine has varied through time and among cultures. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and activities, students will analyze how wine has impacted civilizations throughout history and how, in turn, cultures impact the production and consumption of wine.
View course details
Description
GREEK 3102 : Greek Historiography and Oratory
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: Herodotus and Thucydides.
View course details
Description
GREEK 3120 : Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar in Greek. Topic: TBD.
View course details
Description
GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
LATIN 3203 : Roman Poetry
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: Propertius.
View course details
Description
LATIN 3220 : Rapid Reading in Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3395 : Advanced Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: SANSK 3301 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Selected readings in Sanskrit literary and philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3629 : Greek New Testament Readings
Crosslisted as: JWST 3629, NES 3629, RELST 3629 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A weekly seminar that may be taken in addition to NES 2629. The seminar will provide an opportunity to read portions of the New Testament and other early Christian writings in Greek. We will work on grammatical and textual issues as well as other problems related to translations.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3645 : The Tragic Theatre
Crosslisted as: COML 3440, PMA 3724 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Tragedy and its audiences from ancient Greece to modern theater and film. Topics: origins of theatrical conventions; Shakespeare and Seneca; tragedy in modern theater and film. Works studied will include: Aeschylus' Agamemnon; Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, Philoctetes; Euripides' Alcestis, Helen, Iphigeneia in Aulis, Orestes; Seneca's Thyestes, Trojan Women; Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Titus Andronicus, Othello; Strindberg's The Father; Durrenmatt's The Visit; Bergman's Seventh Seal; Cacoyannis' Iphigeneia.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3646 : The Art of Subversive Writing
Crosslisted as: COML 3460 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Writers are often unable to treat the most deeply controversial issues within their societies persuasively and safely by direct and open challenge, especially in ages and cultures which enforce conformity to some political, religious, or sexual norm. This course examines the literary and rhetorical techniques, formulated in the Greco-Roman antiquity and employed by writers and musicians for over two millennia, to express obliquely what may not be expressed overtly, with special attention to Imperial Rome (Plutarch, Quintilian, Demetrius), Victorian England (W.S. Gilbert), the post-World War II Americas and Europe (Frank Baum, Dalton Trumbo, Friedrich Durrenmatt, Czeslaw Milosz, Theodorakis, Abram Tertz, Jorge Luis Borges, and Vinicius de Moraes), and in selected movies (including Spartacus and Z).
View course details
Description
CLASS 3661 : Hellenistic Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3204 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An examination of the doctrines of the Greek philosophers working in the three centuries after the death of Aristotle. Emphasis on Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Skepticism.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3664 : Aristotle
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3203 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We will study several of Aristotle's major works, including the Categories, Physics, Posterior Analytics, Metaphysics, and Nicomachean Ethics. Topics include nature and change, form and matter, the nature of happiness, the nature of the soul, and knowledge and first principles.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3676 : Ancient Political Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3736 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores Ancient Greek and Roman political theory. We study key texts of thinkers such as Sophocles, Aristophanes Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero, to learn about differing constitutional forms and the source and authority of law, and also about justice, equality, and power, politics and morality, and politics and religion. Through the writings of dramatists, historians, philosophers, and politicians, we explore fundamental questions of political thought in their historical context (5th century BCE - 5th century CE) and also with a view to their ongoing relevance for contemporary political life.  
View course details
Description
CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3735 : Archaic & Classical Greece
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3225, ARTH 3225 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture class centers on the formative periods of ancient Greek culture, the centuries from about 800-300 BCE. Its aim is to place Greece within the cosmopolitan networks of the Mediterranean and beyond, while simultaneously looking at specific local traditions. Only within this complex "glocal" frame will it become clear what is unique about Greek art.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3750 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
View course details
Description
GREEK 4411 : Greek Comparative Grammar
Crosslisted as: GREEK 7411, LING 4451, LING 6451 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of ancient Greek as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.
View course details
Description
LATIN 4456 : Archaic Latin
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7456, LING 4456, LING 6456 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 4626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 4626, NES 6626, RELST 4626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4665 : Augustine
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 6210, PHIL 4210, PHIL 6210, RELST 4665 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An examination of Augustine's wide-ranging reflections on the nature of mind, giving special attention to his later, major works: Confessions, De trinitate, and De genesi ad litteram.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4721 : Honors: Senior Essay I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4722 : Honors: Senior Essay II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4744 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 7744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 4746 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4233, ARKEO 6233, ARTH 4233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 7746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Topics rotate each semester. Previous topics include: Reproducing Greek and Roman Art, Children - Men & Women in the Making?, and "City of Images": Problems in the Interpretation of Greek Vase Painting.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4755 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 7755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from  prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
View course details
Description
GREEK 6101 : Advanced Readings in Greek Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
View course details
Description
LATIN 6201 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The department teaches various topics which may vary by semester.
View course details
Description
LATIN 6202 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
View course details
Description
LATIN 6216 : Advanced Latin Prose Composition
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This advanced Latin prose composition course is for graduate students.
View course details
Description
CLASS 6702 : Geographic Information Systems Approaches to Ancient Landscapes
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will provide a theoretical grounding and practical experience with uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for studying ancient landscapes. The course attends to the complexities of creating, managing and analyzing spatial data from archaeological surveys and excavations. Topics include critical discussions on how data are defined and how they relate to other data (ontology), as well as approaches to spatial data collection, (big data) management and analysis. During this course students will also overview a range of commercial and Open Source software through practical exercises. Students will finally apply insights gained by practicing analytical techniques to draw informed historical and archaeological conclusions.
View course details
Description
CLASS 6736 : Ekphrasis: The Art of Description from Homer to Anne Carson
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6730, COML 6736 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7171 : Graduate Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7172 : Graduate Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
View course details
Description
LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7411 : Greek Comparative Grammar
Crosslisted as: GREEK 4411, LING 4451, LING 6451 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The prehistory and evolution of the sounds and forms of ancient Greek as reconstructed by comparison with the other Indo-European languages.
View course details
Description
LATIN 7456 : Archaic Latin
Crosslisted as: LATIN 4456, LING 4456, LING 6456 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading of epigraphic and literary pre-Classical texts with special attention to archaic and dialectal features.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 4626, NES 6626, RELST 4626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 7689 : Roman History: Approaches and Methods
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2689, HIST 2689 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Offers a survey of Roman history, 700 BCE-500 CE in the lectures and both an introduction to the different disciplines studying the non-literary sources for Roman history (epigraphy, archaeology, among others) and a discussion of important topics relevant to Roman social history (travel, voluntary associations, death and burial, etc) in the discussion section.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7727 : Climate, Archaeology and History
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2729, ANTHR 6729, ARKEO 2729, ARKEO 6729, CLASS 2729 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to the story of how human history from the earliest times through to the recent period interrelates with changing climate conditions on Earth. The course explores the whole expanse of human history, but concentrates on the most recent 15,000 years through to the Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries AD). Evidence from science, archaeology and history are brought together to assess how climate has shaped the human story.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7744 : Late Bronze Age World of Ugarit
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4644, ARKEO 6644, CLASS 4744, JWST 4644, JWST 6644, NES 4644, NES 6644 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
CLASS 7746 : Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4233, ARKEO 6233, ARTH 4233, ARTH 6233, CLASS 4746 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Topics rotate with each semester. Previous topics include: Reproducing Greek and Roman Art, Children - Men & Women in the Making?, and "City of Images": Problems in the Interpretation of Greek Vase Painting.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7755 : Corinth, An Ancient Metropolis
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4353, ARKEO 7353, ARTH 4353, ARTH 6353, CLASS 4755 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This traveling seminar explores the history and archaeology of one of the largest metropoleis of the ancient world. Straddling the Peloponnese and mainland Greece, Corinth was part of several empires. A major harbor city, it attracted immigrants from all over the Mediterranean. An urban center from prehistory through the middle ages, it housed major pagan, Christian and Muslim sanctuaries and religious venues. The excavations offer unique insight into an ancient city's urbanism, infrastructure, civic, religious and private life in the longue durée; and into the inner workings of empires.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7756 : The Roman Economy
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7756 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
How did a large-scale pre-industrial empire like the Roman feed its citizens? How were its consumer goods produced and traded? How did town and countryside engage in this trade? Can we detect economic growth in the Roman world? What was the role of standardization? Was the Roman economy anything like the modern one, and can we use modern economic theory to study its dynamics? This course examines central questions in the study of the Roman economy, with a particular emphasis on theoretical and epistemological assumptions, and on assessing the potential of different types of evidence.
View course details
Description