Current Courses

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GREEK 1102 : Elementary Ancient Greek II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hayden Pelliccia
Continuation of GREEK 1101, prepares students for GREEK 2101.
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LATIN 1202 : Elementary Latin II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Continuation of LATIN 1201, using readings from various authors; prepares students for LATIN 1205.
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LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Todd Clary
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Ovid: Amores and Metamorphoses). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
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CLASS 1332 : Elementary Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 1132, SANSK 1132 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Todd Clary
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
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CLASS 1531 : FWS: Greek Myth
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Dennis Alley
This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and six essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
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CLASS 1632 : Ancient Theater Performance
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
This course is preparation for a performance of ancient theater at the end of the semester. It will involve background reading about the play, learning and acting the lines (Latin in Spring), and preparing the costuming, programming and sets. The play will be selected after auditions among the members of the class are held. All those who receive credits will be acting in the play.
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CLASS 1704 : Statues and Public Life
Crosslisted as: ARTH 1704 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Verity Platt
Why do so many societies create statues, and why do they set them up in prominent spaces within their communities? How and why do statues loom so large in the public imagination? Looking both to the cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome and to the modern West, this course examines the social, political, religious, and erotic power attributed to statues across diverse periods and contexts. Drawing on dynamic "Active Learning" methods, we will explore topics including the foundational role of statues for political states (from the Athenian Tyrannicides to the Statue of Liberty), the destruction of statues (from Christian iconoclasm to Confederate monuments), creative "statue-hacks" (from Rome's Pasquino to Wall Street's "Fearless Girl") and objects of cult (from Olympian Zeus to weeping Madonnas). The course will encourage active engagement with statues relevant to students themselves, including the Cornell cast collection, statues on campus, and those in your own home town.
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GREEK 2103 : Homer
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Ella Haselswerdt
In this course we will read selections from the Odyssey in Greek, with a focus on Homeric poetics, dialect, and meter.
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LATIN 2205 : Virgil
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
Students in this course will read selections of Virgil's Aeneid in Latin, and the entire epic in English translation.
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LATIN 2210 : Conversational Latin II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
This course allows students to practice and perfect the active skills learned in Conversational Latin I (although sufficiently advanced students may enroll without having taken that course) in order to increase reading, speaking, and writing fluency. The main text we will read, talk about, and even perform in Latin is Seneca's The Trojan Women.
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CLASS 2352 : Intermediate Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: LING 2252, SANSK 2252 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Manasicha Akepiyapornchai
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
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CLASS 2636 : Introduction to Christian History
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2695, NES 2695, RELST 2695 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
David Kaden
This course offers an introduction to the history of Christianity from the first century through the seventeenth and perhaps a bit beyond. Our emphasis will be on the diversity of Christian traditions, beliefs, and practices throughout history. We will explore the origins of Christianity within the eastern Mediterranean world, the spread of Christianity, the development of ecclesiastical institutions, the rise and establishment of monasticism, and the various controversies that occupied the church throughout its history. Throughout the course, we will supplement our reading of primary texts with art, archaeology, music, and manuscripts.
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CLASS 2642 : The Art of Math: Mathematical Traditions of Symmetry and Harmony
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2642, MUSIC 2642 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Andrew Hicks
Courtney Roby
Symmetry and harmony are central aesthetic concepts built on a long history of mathematical exploration, not just in the European mathematical tradition but also in mathematical texts from China, India, and the Islamic world. This course will cover theoretical proofs and practical applications from geometrical, harmonic, and astronomical traditions ranging from ancient Greek geometry to early modern science. Topics include geometrical proofs, calculating systems, astronomical models, ratios and proportions, and scales and temperaments.
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CLASS 2680 : War and Peace in Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: HIST 2560 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Barry Strauss
In ancient Greece and Rome, government did little besides wage war and raise taxes, culture focused on war, warriors gloried in battle, and civilians tried to get out of the way. This course surveys the impact of war and the rarity of peace in the ancient world. Topics include: "why war?"; the face of battle; leadership; strategy, operations, and tactics; women and war; intelligence and information-gathering; diplomacy and peacemaking; militarism; war and slavery; the archaeology of warfare. Readings in translation include selections from Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Josephus, and Ammianus Marcellinus. (pre-1800/non-US)
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CLASS 2743 : Archaeology/Roman Private Life
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2743, ARTH 2221 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Annetta Alexandridis
What was it like to live in the Roman world?  What did that world look, taste and smell like?  How did Romans raise their families, entertain themselves, understand death, and interact with their government? What were Roman values and how did they differ from our own?  This course takes as its subject the everyday lives of individuals and explores those lives using the combined tools of archaeology, architecture and art, as well as some primary source readings.  In doing so, it seeks to integrate those monuments into a world of real people, and to use archaeology to narrate a story about ancient lives and life habits. Some of the topics explored will include the Roman house; the Roman family, children and slaves; bathing and hygiene; food; gardens, agriculture and animals.
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CLASS 2806 : Roman Law: Slavery, Crime, and Gender
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2806 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nicole Giannella
This course investigates the rich body of Roman laws on slaves, crime, and women and children. Students will explore the evolution of power over marginalized groups and penalties for crimes at the beginnings of the Western legal system in order to consider ideas of identity, agency, responsibility, and punishment from a cultural and historical perspective. Through an examination of the legal sources (in translation) and the study of the rise and changes of governmental institutions of justice, this course will examine the evolution of jurisprudence: the development of conceptions of power and shifts in the understanding of just punishment. The course is designed as an introduction to these topics suitable for all students.
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GREEK 3120 : Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Athena Kirk
Undergraduate seminar in Greek. Topic: Fall, Plato; Spring, Sophocles.
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GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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LATIN 3203 : Roman Poetry
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Michael Fontaine
Undergraduate seminar. Topic: The Art of Drinking (De Arte Bibendi).
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LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3396 : Advanced Sanskrit II
Crosslisted as: SANSK 3302 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lawrence McCrea
Selected readings in Sanskrit literary and philosophical texts.
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CLASS 3664 : Aristotle
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3203 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Rachana Kamtekar
We will study several of Aristotle's major works, including the Categories, Physics, Posterior Analytics, Metaphysics, and Nicomachean Ethics. Topics include nature and change, form and matter, the nature of happiness, the nature of the soul, and knowledge and first principles.
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CLASS 3674 : Introduction to Indian Philosophy
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3344, PHIL 2540, RELST 3344 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Lawrence McCrea
This course will survey the rich and sophisticated tradition of Indian philosophical thought from its beginnings in the speculations of Upanishads, surveying debates between Hindus, Buddhists, Jains and materialistic philosophers about the existence and nature of God and of the human soul, the nature of knowledge, and the theory of language.
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CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Michael Fontaine
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
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CLASS 3802 : Race and Ethnicity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: HIST 3802, NES 3802 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Nicole Giannella
We will consider two basic questions: did the ancient Greeks and Romans have a concept of race or racial identity? If not, what were the dominant collective identities they used to classify themselves and others? We will explore the causes and conditions that gave rise to collective identities that can be described as ethnic and (in some cases) possibly as 'racial' and how these identities worked in their given cultural and political contexts. We will start with Greek identity in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE, then moving to Macedonian identity and the conquests of Alexander the Great, and finally, to the Roman world, where we will explore the question of race and ethnicity within the context of inclusive citizenship. In each of these cultural contexts, we will briefly focus on slavery, examining whether slave identity was at all racialized.
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GREEK 4457 : Homeric Philology
Crosslisted as: GREEK 7457, LING 4457, LING 6457 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Alan Nussbaum
Language of the Homeric epics: dialect background, archaisms, modernizations. Notion of a Kunstsprache: its constitution, use, and internal consistency. Phonological and morphological aspects of epic compositional technique.
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CLASS 4602 : Emperors, Kings, and Warlords: Political Legitimacy at the End of the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: HIST 4632, HIST 6632, MEDVL 4632, MEDVL 6632, SHUM 4632, SHUM 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Damian Fernandez
This seminar will analyze the transition between the late Roman empire and the barbarian kingdoms in western Europe from the perspective of how rulers, intellectuals, and common people understood legitimate and illegitimate political authority. The so-called "Dark Ages" (4th-7th centuries) were a vibrant period of creativity and reinvention. Class discussion will focus on primary source analysis, and how ethnic (Roman/Germanic), religious (Christian/non-Christian), gender, and other categories informed late antique notions of political authority. We will also discuss how notions of rulership were deployed to challenge emperors and kings. Knowledge of late antique and early medieval political ideas is crucial to understanding modern uses of the so-called "Western" past in current political debates.
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CLASS 4644 : Sound, Silence, and the Sacred
Crosslisted as: JWST 4545, MUSIC 4345, NES 4545, NES 7545, RELST 4545 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Kim Haines-Eitzen
From the ringing of Tibetan singing bowls to the quiet of desert monasticism, religious imagination and ritual is replete with sound and silence.  Cityscapes resound with church bells and calls from the minarets.   Music, chanting, recitations, incantations, mantras, gongs—the world of religion is intimately tied to ritualistic uses of sound.   But sound goes even beyond ritual to the realm of the imaginary, which frequently contrasts the music of the gods with the noise of the demons.   Sound and silence in such contexts are inherently tied to desire, temptation, and even salvation.  In addition, environmental sounds—the sounds of thunder, water, wind, animals, and so forth—are important for religious history and literature and contemporary practices.    This course will draw upon a wide array of sources—from texts to recordings, videos, and performances—to address the function and meaning of sound (and silence) within diverse religious traditions.   Our goal will be to read selections from the field of sound studies, listen and read closely in texts and music coming from diverse religious traditions, and to make some of our own recordings for a Cornell (and beyond) religious soundscape. 
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CLASS 4662 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7173, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Tad Brennan
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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CLASS 4722 : Honors: Senior Essay II
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Frederick Ahl
Sturt Manning
Daniel Gallagher
Verity Platt
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
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GREEK 6102 : Advanced Readings in Greek Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Hayden Pelliccia
The readings will comprise: Hesiod, Theogony, Greek Lyric (selections from F. Budelmann, Greek Lyric: a selection and D. A. Campbell, Greek Lyric Poetry), Pindar (as on grad reading list), Aeschylus, Agamemnon.
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LATIN 6202 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Charles Brittain
Topic: Cicero's and Seneca's Letters & Lucretius De Rerum Natura III.
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GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Tad Brennan
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
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CLASS 7173 : Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4662, PHIL 4200, PHIL 6200 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Tad Brennan
Advanced discussion of topics in ancient philosophy.
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LATIN 7202 : Teaching Living Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
This course examines and models the teaching and learning of Latin as a "living" language; i.e., the various ways of incorporating oral and written exercises to achieve Latin fluency especially in reading comprehension. Particular attention is given to the Foster method and how it compares with other Latin pedagogies.
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LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Scott MacDonald
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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LATIN 7272 : Graduate Seminar in Latin
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Courtney Roby
Topic: Latin Scientific Texts of the Early Empire. When we think of science in the Roman world (if we think of it at all), it is most often in the context of the Second Sophistic, when Galen and Ptolemy dominated the scene with scientific work written in Greek. But in fact, a closer look at the population of known "scientific" authors reveals a peak during the first century CE, especially for literature in Latin. Though many of these authors have not survived in text, they are partially preserved through a wealth of references and analyses from their more familiar literary contemporaries.
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CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Todd Clary
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
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CLASS 7346 : Classic Graduate Preparation Seminar
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eric Rebillard
A course for all pre-A exam graduate students that will both prepare them to be professional ABD classicists and help review progress in language and reading list exams preparation.
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GREEK 7457 : Homeric Philology
Crosslisted as: GREEK 4457, LING 4457, LING 6457 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Alan Nussbaum
Language of the Homeric epics: dialect background, archaisms, modernizations. Notion of a Kunstsprache: its constitution, use, and internal consistency. Phonological and morphological aspects of epic compositional technique.
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CLASS 7682 : Topics in Ancient History
Crosslisted as: HIST 6300, NES 6642 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Eric Rebillard
Topic: Religion and Authority in Late Antique North Africa. The seminar focuses on the structures of religious authority in the Christian church(es) of North Africa from the end of the second century to the end of the fifth century, and on their interactions with the socio-political structures of authority.
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CLASS 7714 : Traveling Seminar in Roman Painting
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6714 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Verity Platt
Some of our very best evidence for Roman art survives in the form of frescoes in Rome, Ostia and the Bay of Naples. Exploring imperial palaces, rural villas, town houses, shops, baths, tombs, taverns and gardens, we will examine the visual dynamics and socio-cultural significance of wall-paintings within their original archaeological contexts. The study of frescoes offers an exciting means of tackling important questions relating to Roman social history alongside the complexities of representation within the Greco-Roman visual tradition, including the relationship between art and nature, the use of myth, the spatial dynamics of interior decorative schemes, visual-verbal relations, and concepts of ornament, medium, and abstraction. This course will be taught as a Traveling Seminar, which will include a trip to Rome and Bay of Naples over spring break. Spaces are limited.
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CLASS 7741 : Methods and Approaches in Current Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7741 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Sturt Manning
This seminar course aims to provide students with a review of, and encounter with, a key selection of the main methods and techniques used in current archaeological work, and to develop an understanding of the current practice of archaeology. Topics included are: (i) methods and practice in field archaeology (prospection, archaeological excavation and stratigraphy, survey archaeology and landscape), (ii) investigation of the climate and environmental context of the past, (iii) relative and absolute dating methods in archaeology, (iv) artifact analysis in archaeology (ceramics, stone, metals, etc.) and the role of the object in the discipline, and (v) approaches and issues in the analysis and interpretation of archaeological evidence (what questions to ask, and how to ask them).
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