Current Courses

Sort by: TitleNumber
Filter by:

View all Summer 2019 courses.

GREEK 1101 : Elementary Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Hayden Pelliccia
Introduction to Attic Greek. Designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1201 : Elementary Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1204 : Latin in Review
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Todd Clary
Provides a comprehensive but streamlined review of the forms and syntax typically covered in LATIN 1201 and LATIN 1202 or a comparable first-year Latin sequence. It begins with a quick review of the most basic grammar and continues at a more deliberate pace with second-term material (LATIN 1202). The final part of the course is devoted to the reading of unchanged selections from Classical Latin authors as a transition to the study of Latin literary texts in more advanced courses. For students who receive an A- or higher, the sequence is continued by LATIN 2201; those who receive a B+ or lower should continue with LATIN 1205.
View course details
Description
LATIN 1205 : Intermediate Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Eric Rebillard
Introduces students to reading a literary Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Ovid: Amores and Metamorphoses). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1331 : Elementary Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 1131, SANSK 1131 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Patrick Cummins
An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1531 : FWS: Greek Myth
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jonathan Warner
Samantha Davis
This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and six essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1541 : FWS: Learning to Write from the Ancient Art of Rhetoric
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
What is rhetoric? Can it improve our writing? If so, how? Speaking was an enormously important skill in the ancient world. It is no less important today. The works of ancient Greek and Latin authors on the art of rhetoric not only teach us elements of style that can enhance our writing, they also offer us examples of that very kind of writing. This course allows you to practice the art of rhetoric by writing on a wide range of topics that the ancients would find just as interesting as you do.
View course details
Description
CLASS 1615 : Introduction to Ancient Rome
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michael Fontaine
Ancient Rome was a village the size of Ithaca that grew into a world empire. In this course students will be introduced to some of its literature, art, and famous personalities in the classical period (2nd c. BCE – 2nd c. CE). In it we will read the masterpieces of Latin literature, from Virgil's Aeneid to Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Catullus' lyrics to Livy's moralizing History of Rome. Special attention will be given to the late republic and Augustan period. No prior knowledge of the ancient world is necessary. All readings are in English.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2000 : Environmental and Sustainability Sciences Colloquium
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2000, ESS 2000, CLASS 2000, ESS 2000 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Johannes Lehmann
Verity Platt
This colloquium presents students with diverse approaches used to interest, educate and motivate people to consider, address and solve environmental and sustainability challenges. The 1-credit version consists of a series of lectures given by experts, people with different expertise and perspectives who are addressing a variety of environmental and sustainability problems.
View course details
Description
GREEK 2101 : Intermediate Ancient Greek I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jeffrey Rusten
Introduces students to Greek prose by reading Plato's Apology. Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in GREEK 1102.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2201 : Latin Prose
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicole Giannella
Reading of a selection of Seneca's letters. We will read these letters with close attention to both syntax and their thought-provoking content.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2207 : Conversational Latin I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
Latin, like any language, is only mastered when one can speak it. Yet the goal of spoken Latin, unlike modern languages, is not conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction, one experiences the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of Latin actively and not just passively. This, in turn, enhances reading comprehension. Remaining rooted in and drawing inspiration from real authors including Plautus, Cicero, Erasmus, Newton, and many others, students will be able to talk about their favorite sports team, television show, musician, or video game, as well as the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and baking cookies (all presentations students have given in the past!). Students should come to this course with a solid grounding in Latin grammar, although no previous spoken Latin is presumed.
View course details
Description
LATIN 2209 : Latin Poetry
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Daniel Gallagher
Ovid, Metamorphoses (selections): Attention will be paid to translation skills, the nature of myth, Ovid's poetic technique, and ancient attitudes towards rape.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2351 : Intermediate Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: LING 2251, SANSK 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Todd Clary
Review of grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit epic poetry and narrative prose.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2603 : Initiation to Greek Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Hayden Pelliccia
Limited to 18 students. Intended especially for first-year students. Students must apply in writing to chair, Department of Classics, 120 Goldwin Smith Hall. No prior knowledge necessary (all texts are in translation). What is necessary is a willingness to participate actively in two seminar meetings each week and occasional supplementary workshops with specially invited guests. This course covers a wide range of Greek literary and philosophical works as well as modern critical and philosophical writings. The focus throughout is on the status of language, the many forms of discourse that appear in the literature, and the attempts the Greeks themselves made to grapple with the challenges inherent in language as the medium of poetry and philosophy. The course inquires into the intellectual development of a culture infused with traditional, mythological accounts of the cosmos. It asks how poetic forms such as tragedy engage with philosophical discourse while creating intense emotional effects on audiences both during antiquity and beyond.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2604 : Greek Mythology
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Todd Clary
Survey of the Greek myths, with emphasis on the content and significance of the myths in Mediterranean society, including the place of myth in Greek life and consciousness; the factors and influences involved in the creation of myths; and the use of myths for our understanding of Greek literature, religion, and moral and political concepts.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2633 : Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome
Crosslisted as: FGSS 2633 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ella Haselswerdt
How did the ancient Greeks and Romans understand differences in gender and sexuality? And how did their gendered identities intersect with other identity categories, like race, class, and citizenship status? In this introductory course we will explore these questions using a wide-ranging selection of philosophy, literature, medical writing, legal texts, magic spells, and material evidence. We will also ask how ancient ideas about sex and gender have influenced our own construction of these categories, and investigate the consequences of modern identification with antiquity. No prior knowledge about the ancient world is required, and all readings will be in English.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2661 : Ancient Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Tad Brennan
An introductory survey of ancient Greek philosophy from the so-called Presocratics (6th century BCE) through the Hellenistic period (1st century BCE) with special emphasis on the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
View course details
Description
CLASS 2807 : Slavery in the Ancient World
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Nicole Giannella
From democratic Athens to imperial Rome, the ancient economies of Greece and Rome ran on slave labor and slavery pervaded all areas of life: farming; industry; families; the civil service; police; and more. This course examines Athens and Rome as slave societies and how slavery was integrated into all social structures and accepted as normal. We will address the following topics: definitions of slavery (including chattel slavery, eventually the predominant form of servitude); the sources and numbers of slaves; the slave mode of production and the ancient economy; the treatment of slaves; resistance to slavery and slave revolts; emancipation and the position of freed people; the social position of slaves; the family life of slaves; slavery and the law (civil and natural); slaves in literature.
View course details
Description
GREEK 3120 : Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Charles Brittain
Undergraduate seminar in Greek. Topic: Fall, Plato; Spring, Sophocles.
View course details
Description
GREEK 3185 : Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
LATIN 3220 : Rapid Reading in Latin
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Courtney Roby
Building on the intermediate level to acquire a literary vocabulary and syntactic structures, this course prepares students for independent reading of major authors entirely in the original language. It is accompanied by intense discussion and analysis leading to a mentored research project informed by secondary literature but based on close textual study.
View course details
Description
LATIN 3286 : Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3391 : Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3395 : Advanced Sanskrit I
Crosslisted as: SANSK 3301 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Lawrence McCrea
Selected readings in Sanskrit literary and philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3676 : Ancient Political Thought
Crosslisted as: GOVT 3736 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jill Frank
Jeffrey Rusten
Ancient political debates about democracy, empire, and justice appear in late fifth-century BCE Athenian dramatic, historical, and philosophical literatures composed against the backdrop of the 27-year Peloponnesian War over the control of Greece (which Athens lost). Reading selected tragedies of Euripides, comedies of Aristophanes, and philosophical dialogues of Plato, in combination with the history of Thucydides, this course retraces, explores, and interrogates these texts' complex, provocative, and surprisingly relevant arguments for and against the pursuit of equality (democracy), security (war and imperialism), goodness (aretê from "excellence" to "virtue"), and fairness (justice), and their often unexpected results in practice. All the readings for this course are in English and there are no prerequisites.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3686 : Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3738 : Identity in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3738, RELST 3738 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Astrid Van Oyen
Have you ever been asked 'who are you' or 'which group do you belong to'? You would have noted how the answer shifts according to who is asking, in which context, etc. While everyone is unique, the possible replies in any one situation are largely defined at the level of society. What is less often realized, however, is that identity shows in particular in ways of doing: what and how one eats; what one wears and when; how one moves in a space. Archaeology is in a unique position to investigate these questions, and the Greek and Roman worlds offer a fruitful test ground, both because of their varied evidence, and because of their peculiar echoing in the modern world and its manifold identities. This course will address current theories about identity and its formation, discuss the various facets of identity (e.g. gender, religion, ethnicity) in the Greek and Roman worlds, and introduce tools for studying identity in the past.
View course details
Description
CLASS 3750 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carol Griggs
Brita Lorentzen
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4677 : Desert Monasticism
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4557, NES 4557, NES 6557, RELST 4557 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kim Haines-Eitzen
How and why do landscapes come to inspire the religious imagination?   And why do religious practices, rituals, traditions, and beliefs take place in particular landscapes? This seminar treats these questions by focusing on the desert, both imagined and real, as it has shaped religious ascetic practice, especially the development of Christian monasticism in the Middle East.  We will read widely from monastic literatures, mostly from late ancient Egypt, to explore both the historical development of monasticism in Christianity and examine why the monastic impulse seems so closely tied to the "desert." In addition to reading saints lives and the stories of hermits, we will read early monastic rules, the desert fathers, and we will draw from archaeological sources to examine the varieties of ascetic practices in the deserts of late ancient Egypt, Gaza, Sinai, Palestine, and Syria. Throughout the course we will explore ancient and modern ideas about "wilderness" and we will explore parallels between ancient Near Eastern literatures and their nineteenth- and twentieth-century parallels in the American frontier and environmental literatures.
View course details
Description
CLASS 4721 : Honors: Senior Essay I
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
See "Honors" under Classics front matter.
View course details
Description
LATIN 6201 : Advanced Readings in Latin Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Courtney Roby
The department teaches various topics which may vary by semester.
View course details
Description
CLASS 6746 : Aesthetics of the Sacred in Classical Antiquity
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7736, ARTH 6736, RELST 6746 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Verity Platt
This course will explore archaeological and literary evidence for the production, display, ritual treatment, and cultural reception of sacred images in ancient Greece. We will focus on some of the most fertile and problematic themes relating to the representation of divine beings in material form, such as the potential and limitations of anthropomorphism; the use of alternative modes of material manifestation such as aniconism and theriomorphism (the representation of gods as animals); the relationship between "cult" and "votive" images; the replication and adaptation of cult statues to new contexts of display; and shifting attitudes to image-worship within polytheistic and monotheistic traditions. Students in Classics, Art History, Religious Studies and Anthropology should find this course of particular interest.
View course details
Description
CLASS 6754 : Byzantine Archaeology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4354, ARKEO 6354, ARTH 4354, ARTH 6354, NES 4354, NES 6354 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Benjamin Anderson
A seminar on the archaeology of the Byzantine Empire, from the late Roman through to the early modern periods. Topics to be covered include: long-term changes in settlement patterns and urban development; the material traces of state and monastic control over productive landscapes; the idea of the border and the nature of its defense; and the fraught relationship between "Byzantine" and "classical" archaeologies.
View course details
Description
CLASS 6755 : Archaeological Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Carol Griggs
Brita Lorentzen
An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7161 : Greek Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: PHIL 4110, PHIL 6010 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Tad Brennan
Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
GREEK 7171 : Graduate Seminar in Greek
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Charles Brittain
This department teaches various topics that vary by semester.
View course details
Description
LATIN 7262 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 4002, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Scott MacDonald
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7345 : Graduate TA Training
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Courtney Roby
Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.
View course details
Description
CLASS 7700 : CIAMS Core Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 7000 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Astrid Van Oyen
Archaeology studies the past through its material remains. In doing so, it builds on wide-ranging theories and methods to develop its own disciplinary toolbox. This graduate seminar explores this toolbox, treating a topic of broad theoretical and/or methodological interest such as emerging topics in archaeological thought, the history of archaeological theory, key archaeological methods, themes that tie archaeology to the wider domain of the humanities and social sciences, or some combination of the above. The seminar is taught by various members of the Archaeology faculty, each of whom offers their own version of the seminar. The seminar is required for incoming CIAMS M.A. students, and needed for CIAMS membership for Ph.D. students.
View course details
Description