Courses

Courses by semester

Courses for Fall 2022

Complete Cornell University course descriptions are in the Courses of Study .

Course ID Title Offered
CLASS1331 Elementary Sanskrit I An introduction to the essentials of Sanskrit grammar. Designed to enable the student to read classical and epic Sanskrit as soon as possible.

Full details for CLASS 1331 - Elementary Sanskrit I

Fall.
CLASS1450 Ancient Egyptian I: Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs For over two thousand years, from the Middle Kingdom (ca. 2100 BCE) into the Roman era, Egyptian monuments were inscribed with hieroglyphs of the Middle Egyptian writing system. Students will learn the complete Middle Egyptian verbal system and continue to enrich their Egyptian vocabulary. We will also begin translating complete literary and religious texts, including the fantastic tale of a sailor's maritime misadventures and divine encounters ("The Shipwrecked Sailor") and a hymn in honor of the sun god ("The Litany of Re"). After passing this course, students will be prepared for the richer, more complex texts studied in the second course, HIERO 1451.

Full details for CLASS 1450 - Ancient Egyptian I: Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs

Fall.
CLASS1531 FWS: Greek Myth This course will focus on the stories about the gods and heroes of the Greeks as they appear in ancient literature and art. We will examine the relationship between myths and the cultural, religious, and political conditions of the society in which they took shape. Beginning with theories of myth and proceeding to the analysis of individual stories and cycles, the material will serve as a vehicle for improving your written communication skills. Assignments include preparatory writing and essays focusing on readings and discussions in class.

Full details for CLASS 1531 - FWS: Greek Myth

Fall, Spring.
CLASS1615 Introduction to Ancient Rome Ancient Rome was a village the size of Ithaca that grew into a world empire. In this course students will be introduced to some of its literature, art, and famous personalities in the classical period (2nd c. BCE – 2nd c. CE) and will read some of the greatest masterpieces of Latin literature. Special attention will be given to the late republic, Augustan, and Hadrianic periods, to Roman ethics, and to the rise of Christianity. No prior knowledge of the ancient world is necessary. All readings are in English.

Full details for CLASS 1615 - Introduction to Ancient Rome

Fall, Summer.
CLASS1702 Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology This introductory course surveys the archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Each week, we will explore a different archaeological discovery that transformed scholars' understanding of the ancient world. From early excavations at sites such as Pompeii and Troy, to modern field projects across the Mediterranean, we will discover the rich cultures of ancient Greece and Rome while also exploring the history, methods, and major intellectual goals of archaeology.

Full details for CLASS 1702 - Great Discoveries in Greek and Roman Archaeology

Fall.
CLASS2000 Environment and Sustainability Colloquium This colloquium presents students with diverse approaches at the art-science interface used to interest, educate and motivate people to consider, address and solve environmental and sustainability challenges. It consists of a series of lectures given by experts, people with different expertise and perspectives who are addressing a variety of environmental and sustainability problems with regard to humanistic concern.

Full details for CLASS 2000 - Environment and Sustainability Colloquium

Fall.
CLASS2351 Intermediate Sanskrit I Readings from simple Sanskrit poetry: the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.

Full details for CLASS 2351 - Intermediate Sanskrit I

Fall.
CLASS2601 The Greek Experience Introduces students to the literature and intellectual life of ancient Greece from Homer to the early centuries of Roman rule. We will read and discuss ancient writers as creative artists in their own right, to develop a clearer sense of what the Greeks themselves sought to express, rather than as sources for a synthetic modern overview of antiquity. Among our texts will be Homer's Odyssey, Greek lyric poetry, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and Lucian, set against a backdrop of Greek geography, history, and art. No knowledge of Ancient Greece (or Greek) is either assumed or required. Texts will be read in English translation. But students wishing to read parts of any assigned works in the original may apply do so independently with the instructor for additional credit.

Full details for CLASS 2601 - The Greek Experience

Fall.
CLASS2603 Initiation to Greek Culture In this course, we will read and discuss a wide range of ancient Greek literary and philosophical works as well as some modern critical and philosophical writings. We encourage active participation in small weekly seminar meetings and supplementary workshops with specially invited guests. Our focus throughout is on close analysis of the texts, and the attempts the Greeks made to grapple with the world around them through literature. The course inquires into the intellectual development of a culture infused with mythological accounts of the cosmos. It asks how poetic forms such as epic and tragedy engage with philosophical ideas while creating intense emotional effects on audiences both during antiquity and beyond. By the end of this course, students will have read a wide selection of Classical Greek literature and be able to perform close readings and comparative analysis of text and culture. In addition, students will hone their discussion and presentation skills in the seminar format, above all engaging with their peers in joint intellectual inquiry.

Full details for CLASS 2603 - Initiation to Greek Culture

Fall.
CLASS2604 Greek Mythology The stories of Greek Mythology have ignited the imaginations of writers and artists from antiquity to the present day, from the tragedy of Achilles to the adventures of Percy Jackson. This course surveys the most influential stories of Gods and Heroes in Greek myths, focusing on their place in ancient Greek and Roman literature, society and religion, but also tracing their course in intellectual and art history through the Renaissance to the present day.

Full details for CLASS 2604 - Greek Mythology

Fall, Winter, Summer.
CLASS2641 The Technology of Ancient Rome In this course we will study the technologies – aqueducts, automata, catapults, concrete and more – that allowed the Roman Empire to prosper and expand. Technical and historical background will accompany hands-on work and discussion of philosophy of technology.

Full details for CLASS 2641 - The Technology of Ancient Rome

Fall.
CLASS2661 Greek and Roman Philosophy An introductory survey of ancient Greek philosophy from the so-called Presocratics (6th century BCE) through the Hellenistic period (1st century BCE) with special emphasis on the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.

Full details for CLASS 2661 - Greek and Roman Philosophy

Fall.
CLASS2675 Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander An introduction to ancient Greek history from the era of the Trojan War to the conquests of Alexander the Great. Topics include the rise and fall of the Greek city-state, the invention of politics, democracy, warfare, women and the family. Course readings are in classical texts and modern scholarship.

Full details for CLASS 2675 - Ancient Greece from Helen to Alexander

Fall.
CLASS2687 Introduction to Military History An introduction to basic themes of military history, e.g., battle, strategy, tactics, war and society, as well as classic works, e.g. Sun Tzu, Thucydides, Clausewitz, Jomini.  Recent theories in scholarship will also be emphasized.

Full details for CLASS 2687 - Introduction to Military History

Fall.
CLASS2691 Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics An introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Proto-Indo-European and the chief historical developments of the daughter languages.

Full details for CLASS 2691 - Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

Fall.
CLASS2700 Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects Why are the most famous ancient Greek vases found in Italy? What was the "worlds' first computer" used for? What can a brick tell us about still standing Roman buildings? What is "classical" about all this and why should we care? This course on the art and archaeology of ancient Greece and Rome will address all these questions. Covering the time span from the

Full details for CLASS 2700 - Introduction to the Classical World in 24 Objects

Fall.
CLASS2807 Slavery in the Ancient World From democratic Athens to imperial Rome, the ancient economies of Greece and Rome ran on slave labor and slavery pervaded all areas of life: farming; industry; families; the civil service; police; and more. This course examines Athens and Rome as slave societies and how slavery was integrated into all social structures and accepted as normal. We will address the following topics: definitions of slavery (including chattel slavery, eventually the predominant form of servitude); the sources and numbers of slaves; the slave mode of production and the ancient economy; the treatment of slaves; resistance to slavery and slave revolts; emancipation and the position of freed people; the social position of slaves; the family life of slaves; slavery and the law (civil and natural); slaves in literature.

Full details for CLASS 2807 - Slavery in the Ancient World

Fall.
CLASS3391 Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.

Full details for CLASS 3391 - Independent Study in Sanskrit, Undergraduate Level

Fall, Spring.
CLASS3395 Advanced Sanskrit I Selected readings in Sanskrit literary and philosophical texts.

Full details for CLASS 3395 - Advanced Sanskrit I

Fall.
CLASS3661 Hellenistic Philosophy An examination of the doctrines of the Greek philosophers working in the three centuries after the death of Aristotle. Emphasis on Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Skepticism.

Full details for CLASS 3661 - Hellenistic Philosophy

Fall.
CLASS3686 Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.

Full details for CLASS 3686 - Independent Study in Classical Civilization, Undergraduate Level

Fall, Spring.
CLASS3750 Introduction to Dendrochronology Introduction and training in dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) and its applications in archaeology, art history, climate and environment through lab work and participation in ongoing research projects using ancient to modern wood samples from around the world. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. Possibilities exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean, Mexico, and New York State.

Full details for CLASS 3750 - Introduction to Dendrochronology

Fall.
CLASS4721 Honors: Senior Essay I See "Honors" under Classics front matter.

Full details for CLASS 4721 - Honors: Senior Essay I

Multi-semester course: (Fall, Spring).
CLASS4757 The Archaeology of Houses and Households This advanced seminar focuses on the archaeological study of houses, households, families, and communities. How is the study of domestic life transforming our understanding of ancient societies? How can we most effectively use material evidence to investigate the practices, experiences, identities, and social dynamics that made up the everyday lives of real people in antiquity, non-elite as well as elite? To address these questions, we will survey and critically examine historical and current theories, methods, and approaches within the field of household archaeology.

Full details for CLASS 4757 - The Archaeology of Houses and Households

Fall.
CLASS6755 Archaeological Dendrochronology An introduction to the field of Dendrochronology and associated topics with an emphasis on their applications in the field of archaeology and related heritage-buildings fields. Course aimed at graduate level with a focus on critique of scholarship in the field and work on a project as part of the course.

Full details for CLASS 6755 - Archaeological Dendrochronology

Fall.
CLASS7345 Graduate TA Training Pedagogical instruction and course coordination. Requirement for all graduate student teachers of LATIN 1201-LATIN 1202 and first-year writing seminars.

Full details for CLASS 7345 - Graduate TA Training

Fall, Spring.
CLASS7691 Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics An introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Proto-Indo-European and the chief historical developments of the daughter languages.

Full details for CLASS 7691 - Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

Fall.
CLASS7757 The Archaeology of Houses and Households This advanced seminar focuses on the archaeological study of houses, households, families, and communities. How is the study of domestic life transforming our understanding of ancient societies? How can we most effectively use material evidence to investigate the practices, experiences, identities, and social dynamics that made up the everyday lives of real people in antiquity, non-elite as well as elite? To address these questions, we will survey and critically examine historical and current theories, methods, and approaches within the field of household archaeology. This course is intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with some previous background in archaeology, material culture studies, or related fields.

Full details for CLASS 7757 - The Archaeology of Houses and Households

Fall.
GREEK1101 Elementary Ancient Greek I Introduction to Attic Greek. Designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.

Full details for GREEK 1101 - Elementary Ancient Greek I

Fall.
GREEK1105 Homeric Greek II This course continues the introduction to the vocabulary and grammar of Homeric Greek began in GREEK 1104, or similar courses. By the end of this course, students will be reading substantial, unaltered passages from Homer's Iliad.

Full details for GREEK 1105 - Homeric Greek II

Fall.
GREEK2101 Intermediate Ancient Greek I Combines reading of classical Greek prose texts (Lysias, Plato, Xenophon) with systematic review of forms presented in GREEK 1102, study of advanced grammar, vocabulary-building and sight-reading exercises.

Full details for GREEK 2101 - Intermediate Ancient Greek I

Fall.
GREEK3120 Seminar in Greek Undergraduate seminar in Greek. Topics: Fall 2022 - Antiphon, Euripides, and Plato's Protagoras; Spring 2023 - TBD.

Full details for GREEK 3120 - Seminar in Greek

Fall, Spring.
GREEK3185 Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.

Full details for GREEK 3185 - Independent Study in Greek, Undergraduate Level

Fall, Spring.
GREEK4457 Homeric Language The language of the Homeric epics: dialect background, archaisms, modernizations. The special language of epic as a synchronic system: its constitution, use, and internal consistency. Phonological and morphological aspects of Homeric diction and compositional technique.

Full details for GREEK 4457 - Homeric Language

Fall.
GREEK5111 Elementary Ancient Greek I Introduction to Ancient Greek. Designed to enable the student to read the ancient authors as soon as possible.

Full details for GREEK 5111 - Elementary Ancient Greek I

Fall.
GREEK5115 Homeric Greek II This course continues the introduction to the vocabulary and grammar of Homeric Greek.  By the end of this course, students will be reading substantial, unaltered passages from Homer's Iliad.

Full details for GREEK 5115 - Homeric Greek II

Fall.
GREEK5121 Intermediate Ancient Greek I Combines reading of classical Greek prose texts (Lysias, Plato, Xenophon) with systematic review of forms presented in GREEK 5112, study of advanced grammar, vocabulary-building and sight-reading exercises.

Full details for GREEK 5121 - Intermediate Ancient Greek I

Fall.
GREEK5130 Seminar in Greek Topic: Fall 2022 - Antiphon, Euripides, and Plato's Protagoras (dialectic contests from Euripides to Plato); Spring 2023 - TBD.

Full details for GREEK 5130 - Seminar in Greek

Fall, Spring.
GREEK6101 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature Topic: Fall 2022: Greek lyric (including Pindar).

Full details for GREEK 6101 - Advanced Readings in Greek Literature

Fall.
GREEK6116 Advanced Greek Composition Review of Attic Greek Grammar and Syntax, accompanied each week, by a short "reading" in Ancient Greek and a short passage for translation from English into Ancient Greek based on that reading. If there is interest, a couple of sessions can be reserved for Greek verse composition (in iambic trimeters).

Full details for GREEK 6116 - Advanced Greek Composition

Fall.
GREEK7161 Greek Philosophical Texts Reading and translation of Greek Philosophical texts.

Full details for GREEK 7161 - Greek Philosophical Texts

Fall, Spring.
GREEK7457 Homeric Language The language of the Homeric epics: dialect background, archaisms, modernizations. The special language of epic as a synchronic system: its constitution, use, and internal consistency. Phonological and morphological aspects of Homeric diction and compositional technique.

Full details for GREEK 7457 - Homeric Language

Fall.
LATIN1201 Elementary Latin I Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.

Full details for LATIN 1201 - Elementary Latin I

Fall.
LATIN1204 Latin in Review Provides a comprehensive but streamlined review of the forms and syntax typically covered in LATIN 1201 and LATIN 1202 or a comparable first-year Latin sequence. It begins with a quick review of the most basic grammar and continues at a more deliberate pace with second-term material (LATIN 1202). The final part of the course is devoted to the reading of unchanged selections from Classical Latin authors as a transition to the study of Latin literary texts in more advanced courses. For students who receive an A- or higher, the sequence is continued by LATIN 2201; those who receive a B+ or lower should continue with LATIN 1205.

Full details for LATIN 1204 - Latin in Review

Fall.
LATIN1205 Intermediate Latin I Introduces students to reading original Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Livy's ab urbe condita). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 1202, LATIN 1204.

Full details for LATIN 1205 - Intermediate Latin I

Fall, Spring.
LATIN2201 Latin Prose Fall 2022: Pliny's Letters.

Full details for LATIN 2201 - Latin Prose

Fall, Spring.
LATIN2207 Conversational Latin I Latin, like any language, is mastered only when one can speak it. Yet the goal of spoken Latin, unlike modern languages, is not necessarily conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction, one experiences the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of Latin actively and not just passively, and this, in turn, leads to reading fluency. Students should come to this course with a solid grounding in Latin grammar, although no previous spoken Latin is presumed. 

Full details for LATIN 2207 - Conversational Latin I

Fall.
LATIN3203 Roman Poetry Undergraduate seminar. Fall 2022 topic: Ovid.

Full details for LATIN 3203 - Roman Poetry

Fall.
LATIN3286 Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level May be taken upon completion of one semester of work at the 3000-level. To be taken only in exceptional circumstances. Must be arranged by the student with his or her advisor and the faculty member who has agreed to direct the study. To be approved by the DUS.

Full details for LATIN 3286 - Independent Study in Latin, Undergraduate Level

Fall, Spring.
LATIN5211 Elementary Latin I Introductory course designed to prepare students to start reading Latin prose at the end of a year. The class moves swiftly and includes extensive memorization of vocabulary and paradigms; study of Latin syntax; and written homework, quizzes, tests, and oral drills.

Full details for LATIN 5211 - Elementary Latin I

Fall.
LATIN5214 Latin in Review Provides a comprehensive but streamlined review of the forms and syntax typically covered in LATIN 5211 and LATIN 5212 or a comparable first-year Latin sequence. It begins with a quick review of the most basic grammar and continues at a more deliberate pace with second-term material (LATIN 5212). The final part of the course is devoted to the reading of unchanged selections from Classical Latin authors as a transition to the study of Latin literary texts in more advanced courses.

Full details for LATIN 5214 - Latin in Review

Fall.
LATIN5215 Intermediate Latin I Introduces students to reading original Latin text (fall, Livy's Rome; spring, Livy's ab urbe condita). Covers complex syntax and reviews the grammar presented in LATIN 5212, LATIN 5214.

Full details for LATIN 5215 - Intermediate Latin I

Fall, Spring.
LATIN5221 Latin Prose Fall 2022: Pliny's Letters.

Full details for LATIN 5221 - Latin Prose

Fall, Spring.
LATIN5227 Conversational Latin I Latin, like any language, is mastered only when one can speak it. Yet the goal of spoken Latin, unlike modern languages, is not necessarily conversational fluency. Rather, by formulating one's own thoughts into Latin and expressing them in real human-to-human interaction, one experiences the unique structural, grammatical, and syntactical features of Latin actively and not just passively, and this, in turn, leads to reading fluency. Students should come to this course with a solid grounding in Latin grammar, although no previous spoken Latin is presumed.

Full details for LATIN 5227 - Conversational Latin I

Fall.
LATIN5233 Roman Poetry Fall 2022 topic: Ovid.

Full details for LATIN 5233 - Roman Poetry

Fall.
LATIN6201 Advanced Readings in Latin Literature Among the Roman poets, Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65-27 B.C.) is notable for his technical mastery, control, and polish. His tone ranges from civilized to acerbic. This course focuses on the Odes, with particular attention to the Third Book, and the Ars Poetica, a hexameter epistle in which Horace offers advice on composing poetry and drama. The influence of both works on poets, dramatists, and theorists continues to this day. While mastering his intricate and often daunting Latin, we will ask ourselves why.

Full details for LATIN 6201 - Advanced Readings in Latin Literature

Fall.
LATIN7262 Latin Philosophical Texts Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.

Full details for LATIN 7262 - Latin Philosophical Texts

Fall, Spring.
LATIN7271 Graduate Seminar in Latin Cicero's De Officiis gives a theoretical justification for the "duties" or general action-types that are appropriate for Roman citizens (or at least elite male citizens). The duties are derived from a theory of human nature:  they are supposed to be the the sorts of actions that will produce an excellent or virtuous person, and accordingly they range from appropriate posture to the selection of fitting professions. Among the duties leading to the virtue of justice is beneficence: how to treat and especially benefit one's fellow-citizens –– the topic that is explored in detail in Seneca's De Beneficiis.

Full details for LATIN 7271 - Graduate Seminar in Latin

Fall.
LATIN7920 Independent Study in Latin

Full details for LATIN 7920 - Independent Study in Latin

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